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CULT: Spring vs. Fall planting of Beardless Irises.

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: CULT: Spring vs. Fall planting of Beardless Irises.
  • From: "william b. cook" <billc@atlantic.net>
  • Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 12:30:41 -0700 (MST)

     The time that Beardless Irises should be planted is something that
should be studied more.  In many climates, spring is for sure the best time
to plant.  In Kentucky, spring planted Siberians, species, and Japanese
Irises did far better than those planted in the fall.  In most climates,
soil moisture is generally greater in the spring, which allows for more
rapid establishment.  August has drought potential, which makes
establishment tricky, and if one goes later than that in USDA Zone 6 and
colder, the soil often freezes before the plant is properly rooted.  
     It looks like that only in the Deep South, in USDA Zone 8 and warmer,
is fall planting best.  Late winter or very early spring would most likely
be a good time to plant in these areas.
     For the above discussion, I am omitting Spuria, which like Bill Shear
said, have a different growth cycle and should be planted in the fall.

Mark A. Cook
billc@atlantic.net
Dunnellon, FL.        EL Nino:  7+ inches rain today and still coming down. 





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