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Iris reticulata


Merrily (and anyone else interested):

Those cute little purple irises that bloom in early spring are iris
reticulata... they bloom about the same time as crocuses around here - but
(IMHO) they are a far more interesting plant.  

I. reticulata are a minor bulb... and that's not a kathyguest critique, by any
means - that's just where you'll find them listed in the bulb catalogs.  The
bulbs are readily available in the fall and I recommend them to everyone.  For
anyone who has NOT grown them, they have grassy foliage and tiny 'dutch
iris'-type flowers.  From experience, I suggest that the darker colors - dark
blue, dark purple - are best (white and pale blue get lost in early spring).
Also, I. reticulata are FAR more effective in a clump.

I believe these bulbs may naturalize somewhere... but not in western New York.
Still, they're worth planting for a spring thrill.

Kathy Guest.. who just saw her first snowdrop and did the dance of joy





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