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Re: CULT: Aborted bloom stalks on TBs??

  • Subject: Re: CULT: Aborted bloom stalks on TBs??
  • From: "Jeff and Carolyn Walters" <jcwalters@bridgernet.com>
  • Date: Sun, 28 Feb 1999 17:51:42 -0700

From: "Jeff and Carolyn Walters" <jcwalters@bridgernet.com>

> From: JEM300@aol.com
> 
> Well Jeff, I went out and looked at them again and the ones in question
have a
> circular spot where it appears there was a stalk and what foliage is left
> attached to this area is dead and can easily be pulled away.  I went and
> looked at other irises that I remembered having bloom for sure and they
looked
> very similar to what these looked like after I would snap off their 
bloom
> stalk.  And...I looked at some other clumps that were older (2 or 3
years)
> where there had been no bloom and I find the same thing on some of them.

Linda,

On very rare occasions I have had newly planted rhizomes with reblooming
tendencies attempt to put up stalks late in the fall that were aborted
because they were frost killed while they were still in the early stages of
development. These particular rhizomes, therefore, never successfully
bloomed, but the reason was obvious because the partially formed stalk was
visible. I am at a loss to understand how there can be a scar on the
rhizome such as is left by a spent stalk when there is no other evidence
that a stalk of any sort was ever present, if that is what you are saying.

Jeff Walters in northern Utah  (USDA Zone 4/5, Sunset Zone 2)
jcwalters@bridgernet.com






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