hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: CULT:Increase




I have been fascinated with the amount of increase per plant for some 
time now.

A couple of years ago, in one of my bored periods, I put all my 
plants onto a spread sheet and counted each and every one for 
increase and coded each.  This took some time as I had about 500 
different varieties then.  I intend to do the same with flowering, 
but so far seem to have some problem or other popping up at flowering 
time.

The results were very interesting.  I was trying to do a comparison 
of varieties.  Factors influencing growth were going to be next.

In addition, I have plans to plant many of one variety and use a 
different growing method/fertilising, etc. using some as control.  
This hopefully will commence next year.

If anyone is interested in giving some information to me regarding 
these, or wanting to know more, please contact me as I would like to 
extend my information.

Regards

Dian Mitterer

here in the beginning of the Barossa Valley,South Australia.





--- In iris-talk@y..., "wmoores" <wmoores@w...> wrote:
> I don't want to sound picky, but isn't the 3 to 5 increase 'rule of 
> thumb' better discussed under culture?  At a show, there is just 
the 
> one stalk, and you cannot tell anything about the clump.  This 
> paragraph is under Garden Judging.
> 
> The counting of the rhizomes should occur in early spring before 
you 
> see any bloomstalks, I would think.  But, since this paragraph in 
the 
> JT handbook also discusses a 15 point deduction for lack of vigor, 
it 
> would stand to reason that the increase is being counted at the 
time 
> the iris clump is judged during bloom season in the garden.  
> 
> Many newer varieties come with the 3 to 5 increases already built 
in.
> You need to wait two or three years before you really decide on the 
> vigor because some of these rhizomes showing increase already may 
not 
> take to your climate and that increase never matures into a fan.
> When I had an extensive sales list, I used to count the rhizomes in 
> early spring in order to make the list.  It was always aggravating 
to 
> list something, then have it bloom out, or nearly so, for you.
> 
> Walter Moores
> Enid Lake, MS USA 7/8


------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
Get your FREE credit report with a FREE CreditCheck
Monitoring Service trial
http://us.click.yahoo.com/ACHqaB/bQ8CAA/ySSFAA/2gGylB/TM
---------------------------------------------------------------------~->

 

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ 






 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index