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Re: HYB: HIST: help - "red" umbratas?


Linda  --  This doesn't have the "crisply defined white rim" that you
mention, but is it anywhere near what you're talking about?  --  Griff


----- Original Message -----
From: "Linda Mann" <lmann@volfirst.net>
To: "iris- talk" <iris@hort.net>
Sent: Sunday, January 23, 2005 6:58 PM
Subject: [iris] HYB: HIST: help - "red" umbratas?


> Anybody know of white ground "umbratas" with red shadow/spot on the
> falls?
>
> I can only think of two amongst relatively recent intros -
> ECSTATIC ECHO (Dahling 1983) and HEAVENLY BODY (Tompkins 1991).  Neither
> of these has the crisply defined white rim that is in my idealized
> mental image of this pattern.
>
> If both white ground blue umbrata and white ground pink/yellow umbratas
> are both from I. variegata and controlled by some wierd, linked
> mechanism, I'd expect to see more white ground red (with both oil
> soluble yellow or pink and water soluble blue pigments) umbratas around.
>
> On the other hand, hybridizers abandoned recessive amoenas (white ground
> blue umbratas) when WHOLE CLOTH and other easier to germinate dominant
> amoenas came along in the 1950s.
>
> Are there many older white-ground "red" umbratas around?
>
> There are some orangish/brownish ones on yellow or cream ground - LOVE
> THE SUN (Blyth), HONEY GLAZED (Niswonger), but I don't know what
> pigments those might be & whether or not there could be both darker oil
> soluble plus anthocyanins in the dark umbral "spot".
>
> --
> Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
> East Tennessee Iris Society <http://www.korrnet.org/etis>
> American Iris Society web site <http://www.irises.org>
> talk archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-talk/>
> photos archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-photos/>
> online R&I <http://www.irisregister.com>
>
> ---------------------------------------------------------------------
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