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Re: RE: Translingual Registrations

zdradsvitsje Yuri

there seems to be some technical limitations on the iris- talk :
It doesn't transmit properly the things we type.
(It's much better on iris-photo.)

What you typed in your messages is now full of squares, and is impossible to understand.

I have the same problem with my own name Loic.
If i type it properly, because there should be two points on the i, we get this: LoC/c

So if the technique already fails us, is there any hope at all ?

About transliteration and translation:

Should "ia me6ia lio6iy" spelled " ia tibia liobiou" or "ya tibya lyobyou" or " ja tibja ljobjou ?
In the latin alphabet, the three spellings sound the same.
But even if the transliteration is a bit aproximative, at least, the translation is obvious : "i love you".

With both, tranliteration and translation, the registrar would have a better idea of the name.

Theoriginal spelling of the name could also be indicated, in it's original alphabet. It might give to some the incentive to learn foreign languages...

It's true it will need a lot of thinking before everything goes smoothly, but it's not because it's difficult that me must not try!

Das vidanja


----- Original Message ----- From: "Yuri Pirogov" <jukp@aha.ru>
To: <iris@hort.net>
Sent: Monday, January 22, 2007 11:50 AM
Subject: Re: [iris] RE: Translingual Registrations

Hi Bob et. al,

The main problem of translingual registrations is transliteration. The names
given in another alphabets should be transliterated but really didn't. The
records in checklist are not transliterations nor transcriptions but not
more than a fantasy of Mr. Loktev who do it.

The problem of correct cyrillic-to-latin transliteration is difficult enough
and has no universal decision. In correct transliteration each cyrillic
character should have one and only one latin character (or bi-character) and
this correlation should be strongly reversible. Such correlations was
proposed not once, but transliterated such manner text looks strange and
unconfortable so no one such transliteration has no large use. Anyway at
least in The lilac checklist such transliteration is used.

Ordinary interpretations of cyrillic names are different in different
languages. For example a American will write my name as Yuri but a German as Juri. But my name is of 4 characters and strongly trasliterated should looks
as something like Jurij.

Looking at the names shown by Loic: NE TRON MENIA, PRIGLASITELNY BILET,
RADOST BYTIYA , PRITIAZHENIYE we can see that russian character bQb is
written as bIAb in one case and as bYAb in another, russian bEb is written as bEb and bYEb, russian character bP,b is not indicated at all. On the other
hand latin bYb is used for four different russian characters and
bi-characters: bQ b, bQ P9b, bQb and beb.

So at this time there is no rules of transliteration for checklist in AIS,
there is only practice of one or another registrar.

There is another question out of  namebs disparity in cyrillic and latin
alphabets: what name is legal? Given in cyrillic or registered in latin?

So if there is a name of Iris fulva bBolshevikb in the Registry, given by
american hybridiser, will be registered that name given in Russian in
cyrillic taking in account that it could be translitered as Bolshevik, Bolb
shevik or BolbE evik? I think no one could misspell the names given in
different alphabets, but transliterated  they could be misspelled.

Juri (Yuri) in Moscow

----- Original Message -----
From: "Robt R Pries" <rpries@sbcglobal.net>
To: <iris@hort.net>
Sent: Sunday, January 21, 2007 6:42 PM
Subject: Re: [iris] RE: Translingual Registrations

Dear Loic et. al;

I would love to see explanations and translations of
names in checklists. It seems especially important now
that we have transliterations of Cyrillic alphabet
names. As I mentioned previously I sought out some of
these out in the section checklists on which I am
working. As many know my ultimate goal has been to
create illustrated checklists. This sounds far easier
than one would expect.

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