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Re: CULT: weather: more
  • Subject: Re: CULT: weather: more
  • From: "J. Griffin Crump" <jgcrump@cox.net>
  • Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2011 18:10:35 -0500

You're probably right about the deer, Betty. I went through one late spring when they were pulling my newly-planted seedlings out of the ground. Plenty of tracks in the garden identified the culprits, but the tooth marks on the leaves indicated they were pulling them out, then, not finding them to their taste, dropping them. They had plenty of other nearby gardens to raid, so I was lucky. Several years earlier, though, I had to give up on a planting in a remote location, when they really mowed the plants down. They seem to prefer hosta, azaleas and other decoratives, but will go for anything tender and green, it seems, when other food is scarce. You may need to shield your pots with a screen of chicken wire if you can't find a repellent that works. -- Griff

-----Original Message----- From: Betty Wilkerson
Sent: Tuesday, January 18, 2011 8:41 AM
To: iris@hort.net
Subject: [iris]CULT: weather: more

Something has been grazing on my irises. When I noticed it in the bed beside
the car port I thought it was my resident rabbits.  Now, I've found they've
removed the foliage from a section of the 3 gallon pots! The bite marks look too wide and big to be rabbits so I have to conclude that the local deer have
run out of food.  I've not seen this before and it's a long time till plants
start growing again.

<<record or other for duration of cold>>

I mention this because I've not seen it before in my years of growing irises.

Betty W.

-----Original Message-----
From: Linda Mann <lmann@lock-net.com>
To: iris <iris@hort.net>
Sent: Mon, Jan 17, 2011 4:16 pm
Subject: [iris] Re: CULT: weather

From what I've been hearing on the news, this winter has broken some
ecord or other for duration of cold.  Sorry to hear that about the
ugs, Betty.  At least the aphids don't have as much green on the irises
o feed them this winter, so I'm hoping they will get off to a slower start.
Low temperatures here this winter are still a good 10 to 15oF warmer
han they used to be, just not bouncing up and down like it used to do.
I don't think it's gotten to the single digits this winter & it used
o drop below zero at least once every year.
This constant cold may be good for the irises, but not for my attitude!
I don't know how you folks with "real" winter every year stand it!
ill daffodils really be starting to bloom in another 6 weeks or so?
ard to imagine this year.
Linda Mann east TN USA zone 7
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