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HYB: Genetics Question


From: Sharon McAllister <73372.1745@compuserve.com>

Betty wrote:

>  According to human genetics, if I wanted to know the potential of my
children,
>  I should check back in all directions for 6 generations for looks and
traits.
>  (Throw backs--We often hear that Little Mike is just like Mom's Great
Uncle
>  Edward, etc.)  

>  If we have a particular goal with our iris program, we need to use
irises that
>  contain that quality.  How far back should we look for those traits in
irises?

I believe that most people consider a six-generation pedigree to be
sufficient.  I run my pedigrees back to species or unknowns, because of the
types of crosses I make.  I don't mean to suggest that everyone should do
this.  

If you're working with dominant traits, you can get by with skipping the
background check.  All you have to know is that the cultivars you've used
carry the traits you want -- and hope some of the resultant seedlings carry
the particular recombination you want.

Recessive traits are more challenging because they can be carried,
unexpressed, for many generations.  In this case, I also pay a lot of
attention to what would be termed collateral lines in human genetics.

Sharon McAllister
73372.1745@compuserve.com

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