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Re: HYB: 'A roll of the dice' augmented


From: StorYlade@aol.com

In a message dated 1/11/1999 7:53:42 AM Central Standard Time, Tmilchh@aol.com
writes:

<< Good luck, Betty. Keep us updated as to how your crosses work. I know it
takes
 a great deal of time. So we will try to be patient. >>

Annette,

I'm sorry.  Perhaps, I didn't explain my objectives well.  At this time, I've
no expectations of my iris lines, except to give me some modicum of pleasure
in the spring, and some summer experimentation.  I don't have enough space now
to do any serious hybridizing, but, as long as I can walk, I will work with
irises in some way.  It's a forty-three year old love affair that isn't over
yet.  However, I did go through a brief time, in Dec., where I was forced to
accept the fact that I might not see my new iris garden in bloom.  Perhaps,
that explains my exuberance when talking about irises.

I have no expectations, beyond fun and personal enjoyment, for the six
seedlings that I saved from this cross!  At this point, their only virtue is
in their strength.  Everything I've read in the past 17 years indicates that
TB crosses, other than line breeding is "a long shot."  Baring happenstance,
the greater the number of variables the longer the shot.  

I truly wanted to pick someone's brain to guesstimate how long the shot
is--only for my own satisfaction and (as I said) to put hybridizing into
perspective, and to put the question behind me.  When I had my large garden,
even customers off the street expressed the desire to make at least one cross.
Many of these people couldn't be talked into going to a show--no time or
interest.  But, their number one question was, "Will you show me how to make a
cross?"  

Most of my hybridizing friends have more than they can handle with their own
programs.  At one time, I had thought that I could still produce breeding
material that other's, with more space, could use in their programs.  (Give
someone an extra set of hands/ideas.)

Sorry, if I've mislead anyone.  

Betty

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