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REF: Journals


From: "Ian E. & Shirley Efford" <avocet.intl@sympatico.ca>

Everyone's view of the world is different and the discussion about the
weakness of AIS is, in my view, reflected in the Bulletin.  It is well
produced and edited but simply lacks interesting articles.  Now, if
SIGNA could be published like the AIS Bulletin, we would be getting
somewhere.

There are three really good iris journals, BIS Bulletin, SIGNA, and one
that few people would consider, the Bulletin of the Alpine Garden
Society.  The AGS in particularly good this last issue, and I would
recommend anyone interested in bulbous irises, juno, or bulbs generally
to find Volume 66, #3, September 1998 in the library.

The volume has a long article on "The cultivation of juno irises" with
beautiful pictures of many of the rare species.  Included, is an
absolutely gorgeous plant of cycloglossa which must have 30 flowers on
it.  Last year, not one of my seeds of this species germinated!  The
year before, they germinated and died!!

Another article is "The hunt for Iris winkleri" a very dramatic account
of the efforts of the authors to climb to one of the highest passes in
Kyrgyzstan to find and iris that has remained unknown since it was
discovered in 1883.  Included are beautiful photographs of the species
and of I. zenaidae, another rare species that they found by chance.  

The whole issue is devoted to the growth and maintenance of rarer bulbs
and a number of the more general articles include references and
photographs of very interesting bulbous irises.  

It is well worth the effort to find this issue of the journal and see
the striking contrast to the AIS Bulletin in the quality of the
articles.  [I know, a journal is only as good as the articles that are
sent in, so may be that is the problem with AIS].

Ian, in Ottawa where the irises and people are undergoing special test
for cold hardiness.  We are told that the wind chill will be between -41
and -50C tonight [and louisianans still survive] and a major snow storm
will blanket the area between now and noon tomorrow.

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