hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

CULT: Companions-Ajuga


From: HIPSource@aol.com

In a message dated 1/23/99 2:08:59 AM Eastern Standard Time, Maslon@aol.com
writes:

<< my self i have seen no better ground cover then :aguga>>
 
Ajuga is a wonderful ground cover for many applications, but in some parts of
the country it may not be suitable for use near irises since it is enormously
susceptible to southern blight, the fungal disease that can affect bases of
both bearded and beardless irises. This disease, also known as crown rot or
mustard seed fungus, is endemic to many parts of the USA below the Mason-Dixon
line and semitropical areas around the world. It is caused by the soil borne
pathogen Sclerotium rolfsii. Because the ajuga--also known as bugle--hugs the
ground closely it fosters development of this fungus when conditions are
right--high humidity and heat. Although usually found in soil which is
compacted and inadequately drained for most irises, southern blight outbreaks
can appear in any soil when conditions are optimum. Ajuga can become a mass of
spores and contagion in very short order and when the fungus passes out of the
active stage the spores will become quiescent in the soil and can be spread
with normal cultivation. 

Anner Whitehead
HIPSource@aol.com 

------------------------------------------------------------------------
To unsubscribe from this mailing list, or to change your subscription
to digest, go to the ONElist web site, at http://www.onelist.com and
select the User Center link from the menu bar on the left.





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index