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Re: HYB: CULT: Essig


From: "Jeff and Carolyn Walters" <jcwalters@bridgernet.com>

> Linda Mann wrote:
> > 
> > In the front of the 1939 checklists, in the biography of Essig, it says
> > he was interested in scientific breeding and selection for hardiness.  

Linda,

Does anyone know how he went about doing this since he was located in
Berkeley, California, which is USDA Zone 9/ Sunset Zone 17?

Barb Johnson replied:
> EASTER MORN was in the 1996 HIPS sale. There is also MOUNT WASHINGTON
> and STIPPLES (don't know who has these).

STIPPLES was in the '94 HIPS Sale, so someone must be growing it. There is
a picture in the Spring '96 issue of ROOTS, where it is classified as a BB.
Carl Salbach (another of the Berkeley Gang) wrote in his 1930 catalog:
"STIPPLES (Essig, '28) A most unusual and pleasing novelty plicata. The
flowers are neat, clean cut white with definite clear bluish-violet
stipplings on the falls. The standards are mostly bluish-violet, but with
pronounced stipplings. The crests are noticeably long and graceful, while
the falls are markedly flaring. The stalks are slender and stiff and attain
a height of from 20 to 30 inches. The foliage is bright and rather fine.
The rhizomes, though small, are very hardy. (Nuee d'Orage X Opera)" 

Jeff Walters in northern Utah  (USDA Zone 4/5, Sunset Zone 2)
jcwalters@bridgernet.com











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