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Re: HYB: germinating fresh seeds


Linda,

Funny you should ask.   I was examining them, oh about a week ago now.  I
was bored and I wondered if they had gone and gotten darker or whatever.
You may rememer that the first batch had gone from completely white to
mottled almond/white.  Anyway, so I had opened the burrito to have a look.

Please keep in mind that I have no idea what a germinating seed looks like
other than the pics on photos...  So I was studying these seeds, one by one.
Just to see what they would tell me.   I made notes 'n' everything.  Some of
the seeds were 'rough' at the butt end.  (butt end = the end that was not
attatched to the pod)  They resembled popcorn kernals that had not 'popped'.
You know hulls, the ones that show the white guts.  If I pressed into these
fissures with my fingernail it felt and sounded the same as if it were a
celery stalk.  That kinda sounds like what you're saying,'Seeds of several
of the crosses have absorbed enough moisture that the pulpy outer covering
is starting to split.'  I haven't decided that that's a good thing.   Do you
know?

Most of mine are still in the 'fridge.  I think someone said they thought
iris seeds needed at least 10 weeks in the cold...

Most of the seeds seemed to be oily.  I'm not sure if that's signifigant.
Some had some umbilical detrius.  One had a crack with a filament next to
it.  All or almost all had a little 'hole' in the umbilical end that looks
just like one of those little buttons that used to always be on a digital
watch, you know the ones you had to use a pen and hold your mouth just right
to get to work.

I picked out four that seemed to be the most typical of what I was seeing
and have put them on a windowsill in one of those little plastic (PET) deli
boxes that you can get at the convenience store with a pizza or something in
it.  Nothing so far, at least nothing green.

I don't know if they are too immature.  I had a couple that had slipped
passed the first screening with deep cuts where I had used the exacto blade
to open the pod.  I disected one of those and found a small kernal of green
material under the endosperm ( I think that's what it was called) and toward
the umbilical end of the 'embryo' ( i think?).  That pod should have been
just seven weeks old when it was harvested.  The seeds from that pod also
have not gotten brown much at all.  Two seeds out of 39 show the mottled
coloring, while the rest remain white.

Well, that's all I know and don't know about my seeds.
Christian
ky

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