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Re: Re: HYB: Aging Seed Pods


Hi Ellen,

The Siberians I got from Mr. Borglum are still blooming right now. I was at his place this morning and bought Lake Seneca. I mentioned the late blooms and he said he'd noticed that too this year. Not a usual occurance here.
Thanks for the yarn idea as a flag!

Molly
ps will do a separate message on what else I bought from him today!

Up here in the Zone 3 mountains (you are Zone 4 you said), I still have some late Siberians in bloom and some early ones in the early stages of pods and pod formation. I tie a brightly colored piece of yarn (have lots of that in this house) around the stalks as they begin to mature and watch them daily. When they begin to turn color (from green to brownish), be vigilant.

I generally take a stalk I am watching and put it in the house in a bud vase with a little water. That way there are no seeds on the ground. I am not a 'real' hybridizer so I don't have tons of stalks that I am that interested in...wouldn't have enough bud vases either.

Ellen

Molly Denza <mollyd1953@hotmail.com> wrote:
>Molly, it's the length of time from pollination to maturation. And it can
>vary within type of irises and even from cultivar to cultivar or year to
>year.
> Just keep an eye on them. After a year or two, you'll learn to
>recognize
>the stages.


I'm heading out today to get some lace and make some caps! That way if I
miss the signs I won't miss the seeds!!


Ellen Gallagher / ellengalla@yahoo.com / Editor, The Siberian Iris
Berlin, New Hampshire - USDA Zone 3
~~
Siberian iris list archives: http://www.hort.net/lists/sibrob/
(1996 - 1998 messages not archived)
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