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Followup to Spring Hill Question


Well looks like I opened a can-o-worms :-)

Well from the sounds of it you folks don't like Spring Hill, which is 
fine cause I was trying to find out a good place to get iris.  I did 
receive some private e-mail listing some great sites in Michigan to visit 
for iris.  Some of these included: Ensata (said to be the best), 
Copelands, Anna Mae Miller, Hollingworth, and Hal Stahly.  I was 
wondering if anyone knew of anywhere else in Michigan.  Specifically I 
would be interested in places in Southeastern Michigan (the closer to 
Monroe the better).

Also someone mentioned getting a Schrieners (spelling?) catalog, and I 
was wondering if I could bother someone for the address/phone number.

Thanks!

P.S. I still need some more info on what to do with these I. pseudacorus 
seed pods.

James Lee from Rainy Michigan (yeah!)
"All I want is an iris and a pond to plant it by...."





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