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Re: TBs with small blooms.


In a message dated 96-07-26 14:12:43 EDT, you write:

>I have two TBs with small blooms, one of which is MADAME CHEREAU the 
>other unknown.  They are quite unlike most "modern" TBs.  Can anyone 
>recommend any cultivars with similar proportions?  Can anyone provide any 
>insight into these irises - are they simply diploids, a subclass of TBs, 
>a separate genetic line or random events?   The two that I have both have 
>papery bracts which is indicative of I. pallida in the background, no?

Papery bracts...indicative of I. pallida, yes.  MME CHEREAU was introduced by
M. Lemon in 1844, and was the most popular plicata pattern iris in the 19th
century.  HIPS (Historic Iris Preservation Society) is devoted to preserving
older irises, and several iris specialist nurseries now list a number of
cultivars.  HIPS also has an annual sale by mail where you can buy many of
the older cultivars for almost 'give away' prices.  

All of the named 19th century irises, to my knowledge, are diploids...and so
are most of the irises introduced in the first two decades of the 20th
century.  It was during the 1920's and 1930's that tetraploids became the
rage.  If you like MME CHEREAU, and it is one of my personal favorites, you
are sure to like QUAKER LADY, MRS. HORACE DARWIN, JACQUESIANA, ARGENT, I.
florentina, ALBICANS, FLAVESCENS, CAPRICE, COL CANDELOT, PERFECTION,
GRACCHUS, FAIRY, EDINA, and almost any Miniature Tall Bearded
cultivar....most of which are still diploids.  Clarence Mahan in VA





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