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Re: Irises for northern MN


>
>Kim Hawbaker asked about northern suppliers.

I, along with Ellen G. admit to living in this climate.  (After visiting my
sister in lower Michigan this last week I am glad I do.  They are two zones
warmer but many zones uglier.)

I planted about 50 TBs last year from Schreiners and Cooleys, mostly from
the 80's.
I lost 5 over winter but I would not swear it was lack of hardiness.  The
others are doing well to not quite so well since I am fighting a brush war
with rot.  Again not the iris fault because I have them planted too deeply.
I dug around each rhizome with my hands and exposed the rhizomes and that
seems to have whipped the rot.

I have about 200 coming from Schreiners, Cooleys, and Commanche Acres.  I
don't have any worries about them doing okay. 

As to how long iris (bearded) can be out of the soil.  When I was beginning
to garden, I used to throw the excess iris in the ditch after dividing and
replanting.  You always have too many to replant, you know.  They would grow
there, at least a good number without care, without being planted, and just
being thrown on top of sod.  It's not my recommended treatment, but bearded
iris are pretty resistent to drying.  

Lee DeJongh in Rhinelander, WI






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