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Re: Nz Native Iris



>
>Here in NZ we have a native iris called Libertia Ixiodies it grows to 60cm
>high in semi shade to full sun with panciles of saucer shaped white flowers
>in the summer followed by seed pods.  It has a grass like dark green leaves
>turning Orange/ brown in winter. >I have it here & it never fails to flower 
& multiplies rapidly.

Sonya

I assume that you mean that Libertia ixiodes is the only native NZ iris that 
is grown in gardens.  Clive Innes, in "The World of Iridaceae" claim that 
you also have L. grandiflora,  and L. peregrinans with a possibility of L. 
tricolor, although in this latter case the description is insufficient to be 
sure that it is a distinct species.  The rest of the species in the genus 
occur in Eastern Australia and South America.  

On wonders why grandiflora, if it does have large flowers, is not 
cultivated. Is there a reason?

Having spent some time in Australia looking for Patersonia, I am keen to 
visit NZ and look for Libertia in the wild.  In the case of Patersonia, we 
found it but were really too early in the season to find more that one or 
two flowers at a time.  October and November seem to be the best times.

Ian Efford
Ottawa
avocet@worldlink.ca

>






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