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Re: HYB: Quarterbreds


From: Dennis Kramb <dkramb@badbear.com>

>From: "wmoores" <wmoores@watervalley.net>
>
>
>
>> From: Sharon McAllister
>  I think
>> it would be an attractive niche to any beginning hybridizer, regardless of
>> age, because no line-breeding is required.
>
>I struggle along but climate is a factor here, too (too wet for the
>half-breds.)
>Dennis is showing an interest and he is full of v & v!  I hope he
>continues.  Celia speaks oh so cautiously of her quarterbreds, so
>she is working in the same direction.

I did lots of arilbred crosses this spring.  I was pleasantly surprised
(ecstatic, actually!) about the fertility (both ways) of two quarterbreds
(SATAN'S MISTRESS and GREEN EYED SHEBA) which I crossed to TB's,
quarterbreds, and halfbreds.

I don't have the resources to do any serious hybridizing yet...but I am
excited about some of my crosses.  I crossed SATAN'S MISTRESS with BEFORE
THE STORM (a nice black TB), and also with GIDEON VICTORIOUS (a nice dark
red TB).  Each of those crosses should produce some wonderful red-black
seedlings.

I will continue hybridizing arilbreds.  One of the paths I've decided to
venture down appears to be rarely travelled territory...regeliabreds.  Most
arilbreds have mixed onco & regelia blood.  A few cultivars by Henry &
Luella Danielson are the only regeliabreds in commerce that I'm aware
of....and I'm ordering them from the ASI Plant Sale this year.

On the edge of my property is a small hill that goes up about 5 ft. at a 45
degree angle (the hillside faces west) and then levels off.  On top of the
plateau are very old pine trees.  I'm going to try planting my arils on
this hillside...which stays extremely dry during the summer.  It should be
an ideal "natural" raised bed for them.

Other arilbred avenues I'll explore are space agers (I would love to cross
I. paradoxa with a really outrageous space ager!) and rebloomers.

I should also say that I'm not biased towards TBs either.  I'll be working
with MDBs and other classes too.

Now just ask me about my beardless hybridizing goals!  :)

Dennis Kramb; dkramb@badbear.com
Cincinnati, Ohio USA; USDA Zone 6; AIS Region 6
member of AIS, ASI, HIPS, SIGNA, SLI, & Miami Valley Iris Society
primary interests: ABs, REBs, LAs, Native SPEC and SPEC-X hybrids
(my gardening URL:  http://www.badbear.com/dkramb/home.html)



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