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Re: SP: Spage Age Terminology


From: Chris Darlington <chris.darlington@sympatico.ca>

Je pense que vous avez raison , James.  I've always been intrigued by
the term SA , even when I wasn't sure what a Space Age iris was!  The
late 50's was a the beginning of a new technological paradigm , a time
when these fabulous irises started to appear with spoons , flounces and
appendages.  I do think that the creation of the Austin Award is a good
idea though , but this shouldn't eliminate an SA from being good enough
to win a Dykes.  I think I'm contradicting myself now , it's just that
The Austin Medal would be a way of giving SA's more exposure.  Many
people think that the future lies in the Space Age iris.

Suppose that this is all a matter of opinion.

James Brooks wrote:
> 
> At 01:51 PM 7/8/99 -0500, you wrote:
> >From: "wmoores" <wmoores@watervalley.net>
> > Space Age is a term that has bothered me, too. Since these
> >irises came along at the time of Sputnik and our space race to
> >catch up with Sputnik, and they were new, the term S A was
> >attached to them as it was to a lot of things back then during the
> >space frenzy. Thirty-five to forty years later, they are still called S
> >A.
> 
> I've got no problem with that. They were introduced in that period when space was a novelty, and our major budget priority as a nation, when each launch was a major television event, and hamburger stands were girded with golden orbits. It defines the era, and that defines the flower type introduced in that era.
> For a long time I felt that the novelty would wear off, because the SA iris had little else to recommend them other than their alien appendages, but that was before the new Sutton catalog and his sneak preview web site came along. Now I think SA iris are coming into the space shuttle age - the era when the advertising department realized that those golden orbits could me superimposed into an M.
> These notes written with a bit of a lump in the throat on hearing on the radio of the death of Pete Conrad.
> 
> James Brooks
> Jonesborough, TN
> hirundo@tricon.net
> -------------------------------------------------------
> Webmaster:
> http://www.Historic-Jonesborough.com/iris/
> http://www.washingtoncountytn.com
> ------------------------------------------------
> Persimmon Katz
> http://kpt1.tricon.net/Personal/hirundo/
> ^~^
> { o o }
> > " < html wizard and goldfish stalker
> u
> =======================================================


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