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Re: Re: SPEC: I. foetidissima

  • Subject: Re: [iris-talk] Re: SPEC: I. foetidissima
  • From: Paul Tyerman <ptyerman@ozemail.com.au>
  • Date: Mon, 04 Jun 2001 22:32:52 +1000

> Rosalie, several years ago the guys at Superstition Iris Gardens sent a
> nice start of I. foetidissima which has grown well but like yours, had
>  It is blooming now, well after TB
> season, which makes me wonder if it has bloomed before and I just missed

Howdy Rosalie,

My variegated (come to think of it) flowers quite late, and often is even
in flower and I don't notice it.  The flowers are not striking, therefore
they do not catch the eye.  It would probably be a little more obvious on
the non-variegated as there are no variegated leaves to draw the eyes from
the flowers..... however sometimes the flower stem can look a bit like a
dead leaf so you don't look at it.

Out of interest... where do people grow theirs?  I know that I.
foetidissima is one of the few irises that will flower in full shade, but
my variegated gets most of the afternoon sun (and flowers every year...
although many years I find that out afterwards when I notice the spent
flower stems).

At the moment here in my garden the Dutch Irises are springing up
everywhere, and I have 4 different varieties of Iris unguicularis flowering
at the moment (the normal, Snow Queen, Blue Stripe and Walter Butt).
Rather lovely.


Paul Tyerman
Canberra, Australia.  USDA equivalent - Zone 8

Growing.... Galanthus, Erythroniums, Fritillarias, Lilium, Aroids, Irises
plus just about anything else that doesn't move!!!!!


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