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Re: RE:HYB:Toughness

  • Subject: Re: [iris-talk] RE:HYB:Toughness
  • From: Sandra Barss <barsssa@mb.sympatico.ca>
  • Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 07:58:54 -0700


Hi

When irises grow in a colder climate (such as Zone 3) they gradually get
used to the
cold in the fall and at that time can withstand temperatures that would
damage them
in the spring.

Based on my experience, I believe 90% of the irises can actually survive
Zone 3
winters (provided they have established themselves),however, what does
them in is late frosts in the spring.  In my area, hardly a year goes
by, that it doesn't start warming up (50, 60 and 70 degrees) in April,
only to have temperatures in the 10, 20, and 30 degrees later on in
April or May.

I have always been blaming the winters for the failure of my irises to
bloom, but I
think it is these fluctuations that is causing the damage.  The irises
starting growing
and get used to the warmer temperatures and then a hard frost comes
along.
And thanks to Linda M. for pointing this out.

This year we had warm weather starting in April and it did not get much
below
32 degrees later and I am having an exceptional bloom season.

That said, there does appear to be a difference in irises in the
tolerance to late
freezes.

Sandra Barss
SE Manitoba
Zone 3


wmoores wrote:

> My OFF BROADWAY appears tender here and gets nipped back quite often
> during the winter, but just the other day Laurie in northern
> Minnesota posted a nice bloom on it.  Wimpy tender in MS and rugged
> in MN??
>
> Walter Moores
> Enid Lake, MS USA 7/8 (Getting good reports on hardiness from Ellen
> Gallagher in northern NH).
>
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