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Horticultural Dye

  • Subject: Horticultural Dye
  • From: Barry Silver <bsilver02@snet.net>
  • Date: Sun, 17 Jun 2001 07:10:19 -0400

A.M. Leonard on the Web has the dye for around 30 bucks a gallon -- get used to blue fingers. The stain does come off after several hours.

iris-talk@yahoogroups.com wrote:

> There are 25 messages in this issue.
>
> Topics in this digest:
>
>       1. RE:HYB:Toughness
>            From: irischapman@netscape.net
>       2. Re: RE:HYB:Toughness
>            From: "wmoores" <wmoores@watervalley.net>
>       3. CAT: PHOTO:  Pretty Rebloomers, (was Wishing for Zone 7)
>            From: "Mary Swann-Young" <MryL1@msn.com>
>       4. CULT: ?source for horticultural dye
>            From: Linda Mann <lmann@icx.net>
>       5. Re: CULT: ?source for horticultural dye
>            From: doris1434@aol.com
>       6. Re: HYB: Toughness
>            From: Linda Mann <lmann@icx.net>
>       7. Re: RE:HYB:Toughness
>            From: Sandra Barss <barsssa@mb.sympatico.ca>
>       8. RE:HYB:Toughness
>            From: Sandra Barss <barsssa@mb.sympatico.ca>
>       9. Re: RE:HYB:Toughness
>            From: laurief <laurief@paulbunyan.net>
>      10. TB:Fragrance
>            From: Sandra Barss <barsssa@mb.sympatico.ca>
>      11. Re: TB:Fragrance
>            From: "lilylvr" <lilylvr@kansas.net>
>      12. SPEC: Iris foetidissima variegata
>            From: Dennis Kramb <dkramb@badbear.com>
>      13. Re: TB:Fragrance
>            From: judyhunt1@aol.com
>      14. TB:Fragarance
>            From: Debi Schmitt <otisbird@fix.net>
>      15. CULT: ?source for horticultural dye
>            From: doris1434@aol.com
>      16. Re: Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
>            From: "MARVIN EDWARDS" <fjmjedwards@worldnet.att.net>
>      17. Re: Iris in Pots
>            From: RYFigge@aol.com
>      18. Re: Iris in Pots
>            From: "robert stewart" <crusher4@wnclink.com>
>      19. Re: TB:Fragrance
>            From: RYFigge@aol.com
>      20. Re: RE:HYB:Toughness
>            From: "Eleanor Cecchini" <eleanore@mb.sympatico.ca>
>      21. Re: SPEC:Wrong again
>            From: Kenneth Walker <kenww@pacbell.net>
>      22. Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
>            From: pbrooks@whidbey.net
>      23. Re: HYB: Seedlings in Cold Frame
>            From: pbrooks@whidbey.net
>      24. Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
>            From: pbrooks@whidbey.net
>      25. Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
>            From: pbrooks@whidbey.net
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 1
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 07:30:09 -0400
>    From: irischapman@netscape.net
> Subject: RE:HYB:Toughness
>
> Toughness seems to be combination effect. If both  parents are weak for cold climates , most of the offspring will be weak. They all seem to fit on a "Normal" distribution curve. The centre point of this distribution curve is determined basically by the average toughness of the parents. Thus two weak parents can produce an offspring that is tougher then either parent but again most will be weak, some weaker, some stronger. If you have only a few strong offspring from a cross you have very limited choice to pick good offspring with other good qualities. Thus if out of 40 children of a cross, only  2-3 have good colour and form etc and only 2-3 of a weak cross are strong then you get to choose the best of 2-3 rather then the best of 40. If one of the weak parents have a tough parent you seem to increase tour chances.
> --
> Chuck Chapman, Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Zone 4/5
> __________________________________________________________________
> Get your own FREE, personal Netscape Webmail account today at http://webmail.netscape.com/
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 2
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 06:46:27 -0500
>    From: "wmoores" <wmoores@watervalley.net>
> Subject: Re: RE:HYB:Toughness
>
> Can you name a few hardy parents you are using?  Are you using
> ROMANTIC EVENING?
>
> Some hardiness is hard to predict or maybe I am confusing it with
> something else.
>
> My OFF BROADWAY appears tender here and gets nipped back quite often
> during the winter, but just the other day Laurie in northern
> Minnesota posted a nice bloom on it.  Wimpy tender in MS and rugged
> in MN??
>
> Walter Moores
> Enid Lake, MS USA 7/8 (Getting good reports on hardiness from Ellen
> Gallagher in northern NH).
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 3
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 07:09:09 -0500
>    From: "Mary Swann-Young" <MryL1@msn.com>
> Subject: CAT: PHOTO:  Pretty Rebloomers, (was Wishing for Zone 7)
>
> The problem is, for me, too many pretty ones!  Check out the AIS Links page, Commercial Growers.  Lots of gorgeous TB photos.  Also, Sutton's (same site) has a VERY handy and concise list of (their) rebloomers, with zone and extent of rebloom under Rebloom Information.  In zone 7, you will have HUNDREDS to choose from.  HAPPY HUNTING!Get more from the Web.  FREE MSN Explorer download : http://explorer.msn.com
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 4
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 08:20:00 -0400
>    From: Linda Mann <lmann@icx.net>
> Subject: CULT: ?source for horticultural dye
>
> <I also color my Roundup with a horticultural dye
> (Purple/red) so I can clearly see where I've sprayed.>
>
> What a great idea!  Where can this be purchased?
>
> Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
> thoroughly enjoying watching the Roundup induced browning of self sown
> millet in the iris row from winter bird feeding...
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 5
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 08:47:07 EDT
>    From: doris1434@aol.com
> Subject: Re: CULT: ?source for horticultural dye
>
> In a message dated 6/16/2001 6:20:45 AM Mountain Daylight Time, lmann@icx.net
> writes:
>
> > <I color dye
> > (Purple/red) so I can clearly see where I've sprayed.>
> >
> > What a great idea!  Where can this be purchased?
> >
> > Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
> > thoroughly enjoying watching the Roundup induced browning of self sown
> > millet in the iris row from winter bird feeding...
> >
> > I KNEW someone would ask! OK . . there's the deal. I bought it probably 5-6
> > years ago. At that time I was buying from a number of different suppliers.
> > I think it came from a Parks Commercial catalog. Came in a 1 or 2 oz.
> > bottle and just takes drops in a 2 gal. sprayer to color it well. You might
> > want to call them at 1-800-845-3369 and see if they carry it.
>        Another source is Hummert, International. They have two locations:
> > 800-325-3055 and Topeka, KS 1-800-798-2799. On page 41 of
> > their 1999-2000 commercial catalog they list SIGNAL SPRAY COLORANT. Comes
> > in a quart size priced at $16.30. The write-up says, "A highly visible,
> > non-toxic concentrated, temporary, blue colorant to add to liquid herbicide
> > solution for visual indication of spray application. It eliminates
> > overlapping and skipping and reveals spray drift. Does not stain
> > permanently. Use 1/4 to 1/2 tst. per gal." (that quart's gonna go a LONG
> > way)!
>        Seeing that this comes in a quart and you use such a small amount,
> > could divide it up among several gardener/iris friends and all
> > share in the cost of the product plus S & H charges.
> >        I find using a dye in the Roundup very comforting. I can see exactly
> > where I've sprayed. . let's just say it makes me feel more secure while
> > using an herbicide.
> >        If I figure out where my original product came from, I'll post it to
> > Iris-talk PDQ!
>
> Doris Elevier, El Paso, TX Zone 7, AHS 9-10 Hot, dry, AND windy.
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 6
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 08:49:21 -0400
>    From: Linda Mann <lmann@icx.net>
> Subject: Re: HYB: Toughness
>
> Thanks Chuck - that's pretty much what I expected, but I could imagine
> there might be non-random things going on, given the peculiar nature of
> iris genes (i.e., amphidiploidy).
>
> The grandparent thing is interesting.  When you say a tough grandparent
> increases the chances of tough offspring, is that also random?
>
> <Toughness seems to be a combination effect. If both  parents are weak
> for cold climates, most of the offspring will be weak. They all seem to
> fit on a "Normal" distribution curve. The centre point of this
> distribution curve is determined basically by the average toughness of
> the parents. Thus two weak parents can produce an offspring that is
> tougher then either parent but again most will be weak, some weaker,
> some stronger. ... If one of the weak parents has a tough parent you
> seem to increase your chances.  Chuck Chapman, Guelph, Ontario, Canada.
> Zone 4/5>
>
> Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 7
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 07:58:54 -0700
>    From: Sandra Barss <barsssa@mb.sympatico.ca>
> Subject: Re: RE:HYB:Toughness
>
> Hi
>
> When irises grow in a colder climate (such as Zone 3) they gradually get
> used to the
> cold in the fall and at that time can withstand temperatures that would
> damage them
> in the spring.
>
> Based on my experience, I believe 90% of the irises can actually survive
> Zone 3
> winters (provided they have established themselves),however, what does
> them in is late frosts in the spring.  In my area, hardly a year goes
> by, that it doesn't start warming up (50, 60 and 70 degrees) in April,
> only to have temperatures in the 10, 20, and 30 degrees later on in
> April or May.
>
> I have always been blaming the winters for the failure of my irises to
> bloom, but I
> think it is these fluctuations that is causing the damage.  The irises
> starting growing
> and get used to the warmer temperatures and then a hard frost comes
> along.
> And thanks to Linda M. for pointing this out.
>
> This year we had warm weather starting in April and it did not get much
> below
> 32 degrees later and I am having an exceptional bloom season.
>
> That said, there does appear to be a difference in irises in the
> tolerance to late
> freezes.
>
> Sandra Barss
> SE Manitoba
> Zone 3
>
> wmoores wrote:
>
> > My OFF BROADWAY appears tender here and gets nipped back quite often
> > during the winter, but just the other day Laurie in northern
> > Minnesota posted a nice bloom on it.  Wimpy tender in MS and rugged
> > in MN??
> >
> > Walter Moores
> > Enid Lake, MS USA 7/8 (Getting good reports on hardiness from Ellen
> > Gallagher in northern NH).
> >
> >                    Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
>   [Image]
>                                         [Image]
>            www.
>
> >
> > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 8
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 08:02:08 -0700
>    From: Sandra Barss <barsssa@mb.sympatico.ca>
> Subject: RE:HYB:Toughness
>
> oops, forgot to qualify my previous e-mail - should be given adequate
> snow cover -
> 90% can survive.................
>
> Sandra
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 9
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 01 09:15:01 -0000
>    From: laurief <laurief@paulbunyan.net>
> Subject: Re: RE:HYB:Toughness
>
> >My OFF BROADWAY appears tender here and gets nipped back quite often
> >during the winter, but just the other day Laurie in northern
> >Minnesota posted a nice bloom on it.  Wimpy tender in MS and rugged
> >in MN??
>
> I think the reason OB is blooming so nicely for me, Walter, is because by
> the time any significant plant growth commences way up here in zone 3b -
> and before any TB would even consider starting to grow a bloomstalk - our
> hard freezes are essentially done for the season.  Not that we couldn't
> get a devastating late freeze, but those wild hot period/cold period
> swings that apparently happen in MS and TN during stalk development
> rarely happen here.  I guess there are advantages to having to suffer
> through a couple months of *everyone else's* spring bloom reports before
> my irises have even broken ground.  ;-)
>
> Laurie - with another 8 new (to me) TBs open today in the garden!  Time
> to grab the digital camera, which at this point may as well be growing
> directly out of my hand!
>
> zone 3b northern MN
>
> -----------------
> laurief@paulbunyan.net
> http://www.geocities.com/lfandjg/
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 10
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 11:22:14 -0700
>    From: Sandra Barss <barsssa@mb.sympatico.ca>
> Subject: TB:Fragrance
>
> I am looking for Tall Bearded Irises that are very fragrant (pleasantly
> so), does
> anyone have any recommendations.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Sandra
> SE Manitoba
> Zone 3
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 11
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 11:35:47 -0700
>    From: "lilylvr" <lilylvr@kansas.net>
> Subject: Re: TB:Fragrance
>
> Mary Francis is wonderful.
> Wendy Zone 5
>   ----- Original Message -----
>   From: Sandra Barss
>   To: iris-talk@yahoogroups.com
>   Sent: Saturday, June 16, 2001 11:22 AM
>   Subject: [iris-talk] TB:Fragrance
>
>   I am looking for Tall Bearded Irises that are very fragrant (pleasantly
>   so), does
>   anyone have any recommendations.
>
>   Thanks.
>
>   Sandra
>   SE Manitoba
>   Zone 3
>
>         Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
>
>         Enter to Win!
>
>
>   Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 12
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 15:05:07 -0400
>    From: Dennis Kramb <dkramb@badbear.com>
> Subject: SPEC: Iris foetidissima variegata
>
> A few weeks ago we were discussing how Iris foetidissima "variegata"
> is typically grown for its foliage because its flowers are
> insignificant and they're sterile and don't produce those lovely seed
> pods.  Well mine produced a seed pod!  I will post some photos.
>
> I will be sure to report back when the pod ripens if it contains any
> seeds or is just a balloon pod.
> --
> Dennis Kramb; dkramb@badbear.com
> Cincinnati, Ohio USA; USDA Zone 6
> http://www.badbear.com/dkramb/
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 13
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 17:36:23 EDT
>    From: judyhunt1@aol.com
> Subject: Re: TB:Fragrance
>
> In a message dated 6/16/01 5:09:54 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
> barsssa@mb.sympatico.ca writes:
>
> < I am looking for Tall Bearded Irises that are very fragrant (pleasantly
>  so), does anyone have any recommendations.>
>
> There are a lot that are wonderfully fragrant (to my nose!), Sandra.  Many
> have the grape scent that comes from i. pallida.  Another scent that comes to
> mind is from Walter Moores' LEMON CHESS...maybe it is psychological, but to
> me it smells lemony!
>
> Judy Hunt in Louisville, KY, Zone 6
>
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 14
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 15:24:23 -0700
>    From: Debi Schmitt <otisbird@fix.net>
> Subject: TB:Fragarance
>
> >am looking for Tall Bearded Irises that are very fragrant
>
> Orange Popsicle.  It smells WONDERFUL!!!  It's by Sutton
>                .---.__
>               /  /6|__\
>               \  \/--`
>               /  \\           debi
>              /    )\
>             /  _.' /
>            //~`\\-'
> =====//===(=))=========
>   jgs  /`
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 15
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 19:11:11 EDT
>    From: doris1434@aol.com
> Subject: CULT: ?source for horticultural dye
>
> For those who asked about the horticultural dye - I have the name of the
> manufacturer. . It's Sorensen Sprayers, Inc., Worthington, MN 56187. This is
> the original dye I've been using for a number of years. Unfortunately I still
> don't know who I ordered it from . . .
>        I just ran an Internet search through Copernic for Sorensen Sprayers
> and the search turned up nothing so they obviously don't have a web page.
>        Hope this helps. . .
>
> Doris Elevier, El Paso, TX Zone 7, AHS 9-10 Hot, dry, AND windy.
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 16
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 17:36:04 -0700
>    From: "MARVIN EDWARDS" <fjmjedwards@worldnet.att.net>
> Subject: Re: Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
>
> Neil, I tried the experiment of planting seeds right of out of the pod into the garden last year.  Fortunately I used a bee pod I really didn't want.  I planted 36 seeds and only 10 sprouted.  That's not good enough.  I will continue soaking and chilling my seeds.  I get at least 75 percent germination that way.
> Francelle Edwards at our cabin near Prescott, zone 6 were irises without water for 6 weeks still look good.
>
>   ----- Original Message -----
>   From: neilm@charter.net
>   To: iris-talk@yahoogroups.com
>   Sent: Friday, June 15, 2001 2:45 AM
>   Subject: [iris-talk] Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
>
>   --- In iris-talk@y..., pbrooks@w... wrote:
>
>   "...then toss them with dry milk in each cup to act as
>   dessicator...."
>
>   Might be worth your while not to use the dry milk on part of the
>   seeds to compare the effects of using/not using.  I suspect the two
>   weeks chill may not require the dessicant.  Two weeks may also be
>   rather short for TB's.
>
>   An additional option you might consider trying is NOT drying some of
>   the seed, but planting immediately upon harvest with no chill or soak
>   at all while the seed is still unshrunken, soft.
>
>   Good luck on your experiment.
>
>   Neil Mogensen,  zone 6b/7a near Asheville, NC
>
>         Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
>
>         Click for Details
>
>
>   Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 17
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 21:19:42 EDT
>    From: RYFigge@aol.com
> Subject: Re: Iris in Pots
>
> Laetitia, you don't say what State you are in!  Zone 5 can be fairly cold!  I
> contacted a friend who had kept potted irises over a winter in zone6//7 and
> one year it was very cold and she lost 90% -- another year it was fairly warm
> for winter and everything was fine.  BUT remember that most garages are
> usually dark, and you would need some lights for the irises, also water
> occasionally -- a cold frame would be better, and the idea of "planting" the
> pots in the ground is a good one, and then mulch around the pots --not he
> irises.  Good luck!  Rosalie nr Baltimore zone 7 with rain, the remnants of
> Allison -- ryfigge@aol.com
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 18
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 21:50:39 -0400
>    From: "robert stewart" <crusher4@wnclink.com>
> Subject: Re: Iris in Pots
>
> Hi,
>
> Would a cold frame work well in zone 7 with iris in pots.  Thanks for info.
>   ----- Original Message -----
>   From: RYFigge@aol.com
>   To: iris-talk@yahoogroups.com
>   Sent: Saturday, June 16, 2001 9:19 PM
>   Subject: Re: [iris-talk] Iris in Pots
>
>   Laetitia, you don't say what State you are in!  Zone 5 can be fairly cold!  I
>   contacted a friend who had kept potted irises over a winter in zone6//7 and
>   one year it was very cold and she lost 90% -- another year it was fairly warm
>   for winter and everything was fine.  BUT remember that most garages are
>   usually dark, and you would need some lights for the irises, also water
>   occasionally -- a cold frame would be better, and the idea of "planting" the
>   pots in the ground is a good one, and then mulch around the pots --not he
>   irises.  Good luck!  Rosalie nr Baltimore zone 7 with rain, the remnants of
>   Allison -- ryfigge@aol.com
>
>         Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
>
>         Click for Details
>
>
>   Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 19
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 22:10:03 EDT
>    From: RYFigge@aol.com
> Subject: Re: TB:Fragrance
>
> I think a checklist -type for frgrance was published some years ago by
> ?---Smith on the Eastern Shore of Maryland  Have you see that?   Rosalie nr
> Baltimore USA  zone 7  ryfigge@aol.com
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 20
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 22:10:57 -0500
>    From: "Eleanor Cecchini" <eleanore@mb.sympatico.ca>
> Subject: Re: RE:HYB:Toughness
>
> I would agree with you, Sandra!  I check my irises for viability, which
> means if I see it start to grow, I mark it as having survived winter.
> Later, after a severe frost, I note the same iris is either dead or severely
> damaged, and no bloom for that season.
>
> MDB Red at Last actually made it to setting buds.  We had a cold week, and
> it just withered away.  I thought it had leaf spot or ant damage.  Dug it up
> a while back, and all the rhizomes were healthy as could be.  It's drying
> out in the shed for now.  Same with MDB Bee Wings.  It actually started to
> bloom before the cold weather, then it rapidly declined.  It too is drying
> in the shed.
>
> I've had a fantastic bloom season, aside from that, but many irises set 4
> falls, which I had only seen on SDB Sarah Taylor before.  She, of course,
> set only 3 falls this year!
>
> Note that TB Edith Wolford has survived her 3rd and last chance here, but I
> doubt she'll set buds because of the late frosts and colder weather we had.
>
> El, near Winnipeg
> Manitoba, Canada Z3
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Sandra Barss <barsssa@mb.sympatico.ca>
> To: iris-talk@yahoogroups.com <iris-talk@yahoogroups.com>
> Date: Saturday, June 16, 2001 7:52 AM
> Subject: Re: [iris-talk] RE:HYB:Toughness
>
> >When irises grow in a colder climate (such as Zone 3) they gradually get
> >used to the cold in the fall and at that time can withstand temperatures
> that would
> >damage them in the spring.
> >
> >Based on my experience, I believe 90% of the irises can actually survive
> >Zone 3 winters (provided they have established themselves),however, what
> does
> >them in is late frosts in the spring.
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 21
>    Date: Sat, 16 Jun 2001 20:27:22 -0700
>    From: Kenneth Walker <kenww@pacbell.net>
> Subject: Re: SPEC:Wrong again
>
> In case people are interested in more details on my experience with
> this confusion, I've posted a message with a couple pictures on iris-photos.
>
>    Ken Walker
>
> Bill Shear wrote:
>
> > After reviewing my pictures, I think what I have been growing as Iris lazica
> > is in fact I. douglasiana, perhaps a dwarf form.   We know from previous
> > messages that ARGS was distributing seed from such a plant under the name I.
> > lazica.  I think this was the source for the plants from Arrowhead Alpines,
> > and those which I also saw this spring at Plant Delights.
> >
> > I apologize for any confusion my postings might have caused.  The flowers in
> > my pictures are clearly not from the Unguiculares Series.
> >
> > Anyhow, it's fine that I can grow I. douglasiana here.
> >
> > Bill Shear
> > Department of Biology
> > Hampden-Sydney College
> > Hampden-Sydney VA 23943
> > (434)223-6172
> > FAX (434)223-6374
> > email<wshear@email.hsc.edu>
> > Moderating e-lists:
> > Coleus at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/coleus
> > Opiliones at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/opiliones
> > Myriapod at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/myriapod
> >
> > "Say, listen buddy, I can outgrabe any mome rath that ever lived!"  --James
> > Thurber
> >
> >
> >
> > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 22
>    Date: Sun, 17 Jun 2001 04:12:29 -0000
>    From: pbrooks@whidbey.net
> Subject: Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
>
> --- In iris-talk@y..., neilm@c... wrote:
> > --- In iris-talk@y..., pbrooks@w... wrote:
> >
> > "...then toss them with dry milk in each cup to act as
> > dessicator...."
> >
> > Might be worth your while not to use the dry milk on part of the
> > seeds to compare the effects of using/not using.  I suspect the two
> > weeks chill may not require the dessicant.  Two weeks may also be
> > rather short for TB's.
> >
> > An additional option you might consider trying is NOT drying some
> of
> > the seed, but planting immediately upon harvest with no chill or
> soak
> > at all while the seed is still unshrunken, soft.
> >
> > Good luck on your experiment.
> >
> > Neil Mogensen,  zone 6b/7a near Asheville, NC
>
> Thanks for the suggestions, Neil.  So much of this seems a toss-up.
> I do tend to trust Mother Nature more than the fiddlers-with such as
> we.  And bearded irises do seem to love it here, even without
> freezes.  I have beds on all sides of this apartment complex, was
> worried that some wouldn't get enough sun.  But got magnificent bloom
> on all.
>
> So what I might do is do some with/without drying, some with/without
> soaking, with/without freezing, etc.  And some straight out in soil
> I've already prepared.  I have some that are really important to me,
> others less so.  I'm hoping to get at least some sprouts of each.
>
> Thanks again.  Any suggestions from others?
> Patricia Brooks
> Whidbey Island, WA, zone 8
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 23
>    Date: Sun, 17 Jun 2001 04:33:23 -0000
>    From: pbrooks@whidbey.net
> Subject: Re: HYB: Seedlings in Cold Frame
>
> Linda,
>
> I was interested in your saying that most of your crosses were wide.
> I'm wondering how you measure "wide."  Different colors altogether?
> Or patterns?  This is my first year of crossing, and I've made many
> crosses within the same general color, as well as some wider --
> mostly pinks with blues in my pursuit of the pink-with-blue-beard.
> So I'd have some to compare germination-wise.
>
> As sisters-in-growing-zone, I'd especially value your experience with
> all this.
>
> Patricia Brooks
> Whidbey Island, WA, zone 8
>
> --- In iris-talk@y..., "robert stewart" <crusher4@w...> wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > New to iristalk was reading your info and decided to ask you why
> you wish you were in zone 7.  Reason being and I am in zone 7.  Is
> this a great place to start TB seed.  Where can seed be got.  Sure
> learn alot in iristalk and meet some of the nicest people.
> >
> >                                    Sandy
> >   ----- Original Message -----
> >   From: Linda Mann
> >   To: iris-talk@y...
> >   Sent: Friday, June 15, 2001 7:06 AM
> >   Subject: [iris-talk] Re: HYB: Seedlings in Cold Frame
> >
> >
> >   <I thought I'd do a four-way trial....I'll have enough seeds to go
> >   several ways.  Wish I was in zone 7! Mary Lou, near
> Indianapolis,  a
> >   solid zone 5.>
> >
> >   Apologies if you already have thought of this, but keep in mind
> that
> >   different crosses (and unfortunately, individual seeds within one
> cross)
> >   will possibly/probably respond to your treatments in different
> ways.  So
> >   we will need to split the seeds from each cross among
> treatments.  Most
> >   of my crosses are wide and seem to produce less than full seed
> pods, but
> >   I should have 20 seeds or so from each of my crosses.  I will
> experiment
> >   with 6 or so seeds from each cross - unfortunately, that may not
> give me
> >   any seedlings if I have my usual low germination rate.
> >
> >   If anybody has about 100 seeds from an individual TB cross (which
> brings
> >   up another topic that I will post separately) that they'd like me
> to
> >   experiment with, I'll do it ('normal' outdoor late fall planting
> vs
> >   summer chill, soak, & start early, then overwinter outdoors).
> >
> >   Good luck Mary Lou - be interesting to compare notes here next
> year and
> >   the following year.
> >
> >   Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
> >
> >
> >         Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
> >
> >         Click for Details
> >
> >
> >   Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
> Service.
> >
> >
> >
> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 24
>    Date: Sun, 17 Jun 2001 04:55:17 -0000
>    From: pbrooks@whidbey.net
> Subject: Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
>
> Francelle,
>
> How long do you freeze your TB seeds?  And do you soak three days as
> has been said here, with water changes?
>
> Patricia
>
> --- In iris-talk@y..., "MARVIN EDWARDS" <fjmjedwards@w...> wrote:
> > Neil, I tried the experiment of planting seeds right of out of the
> pod into the garden last year.  Fortunately I used a bee pod I really
> didn't want.  I planted 36 seeds and only 10 sprouted.  That's not
> good enough.  I will continue soaking and chilling my seeds.  I get
> at least 75 percent germination that way.
> > Francelle Edwards at our cabin near Prescott, zone 6 were irises
> without water for 6 weeks still look good.
> >
> >   ----- Original Message -----
> >   From: neilm@c...
> >   To: iris-talk@y...
> >   Sent: Friday, June 15, 2001 2:45 AM
> >   Subject: [iris-talk] Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
> >
> >
> >   --- In iris-talk@y..., pbrooks@w... wrote:
> >
> >   "...then toss them with dry milk in each cup to act as
> >   dessicator...."
> >
> >   Might be worth your while not to use the dry milk on part of the
> >   seeds to compare the effects of using/not using.  I suspect the
> two
> >   weeks chill may not require the dessicant.  Two weeks may also be
> >   rather short for TB's.
> >
> >   An additional option you might consider trying is NOT drying some
> of
> >   the seed, but planting immediately upon harvest with no chill or
> soak
> >   at all while the seed is still unshrunken, soft.
> >
> >   Good luck on your experiment.
> >
> >   Neil Mogensen,  zone 6b/7a near Asheville, NC
> >
> >
> >         Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
> >
> >         Click for Details
> >
> >
> >   Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
> Service.
> >
> >
> >
> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Message: 25
>    Date: Sun, 17 Jun 2001 04:55:57 -0000
>    From: pbrooks@whidbey.net
> Subject: Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
>
> --- In iris-talk@y..., "MARVIN EDWARDS" <fjmjedwards@w...> wrote:
> > Neil, I tried the experiment of planting seeds right of out of the
> pod into the garden last year.  Fortunately I used a bee pod I really
> didn't want.  I planted 36 seeds and only 10 sprouted.  That's not
> good enough.  I will continue soaking and chilling my seeds.  I get
> at least 75 percent germination that way.
> > Francelle Edwards at our cabin near Prescott, zone 6 were irises
> without water for 6 weeks still look good.
> >
> >   ----- Original Message -----
> >   From: neilm@c...
> >   To: iris-talk@y...
> >   Sent: Friday, June 15, 2001 2:45 AM
> >   Subject: [iris-talk] Re: CULT: Starting TBs in Cold Frame
> >
> >
> >   --- In iris-talk@y..., pbrooks@w... wrote:
> >
> >   "...then toss them with dry milk in each cup to act as
> >   dessicator...."
> >
> >   Might be worth your while not to use the dry milk on part of the
> >   seeds to compare the effects of using/not using.  I suspect the
> two
> >   weeks chill may not require the dessicant.  Two weeks may also be
> >   rather short for TB's.
> >
> >   An additional option you might consider trying is NOT drying some
> of
> >   the seed, but planting immediately upon harvest with no chill or
> soak
> >   at all while the seed is still unshrunken, soft.
> >
> >   Good luck on your experiment.
> >
> >   Neil Mogensen,  zone 6b/7a near Asheville, NC
> >
> >
> >         Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
> >
> >         Click for Details
> >
> >
> >   Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
> Service.
> >
> >
> >
> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> ________________________________________________________________________
>
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


 

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