hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

REF:Sunset Western Garden Book

  • Subject: REF:Sunset Western Garden Book
  • From: John Reeds <jreeds@microsensors.com>
  • Date: Wed, 27 Jun 2001 16:05:26 -0700

With the discussions of books lately, I consider a non-iris-specific garden
book worth a mention.  Most of us in California consider the Sunset Western
Garden Book (updated annually) as a reference "bible" on almost everything
(in the way of plants) that can be grown in the western USA.  Many
Australian subscribers to this group might find a great deal of overlap in
climate and plant compatibility.  If you are not aware of this book, but
still have room to grow something other than iris, if you are from a
compatible climate, you should get it.  It may not always list the most
recent cultivars of all plant species, but they do a remarkable and very
thorough job of trying to compare the merits and cultural requirement
variations of (for example) about 30 varieties of strawberries, 50 bamboos,
30 apples, etc.

They also have an improved climate zone breakdown (I'm a 23 which is
probably a subset of USDA 9b), which recognizes that coldest annual
temperatures are not sufficient to define a climate.  My refrigerator would
be a USDA 10: very warm.  It rarely goes below freezing.

John Reeds, in sunny southern Calif.
jreeds@microsensors.com  

 

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ 






 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index