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Re: TB: HYB: Red Amoenas


Kent, you haven't been getting any feedback on this question, so I'll
take a stab at it.  And posted a photo of a sort of red amoena.  It's a
rose red amoena, & I haven't looked at the pedigree, but some rose
colors are all blue/purple pigment.  So it may not be even close to what
you are asking about.

Since red has both blue/purple and yellow(pink, orange) pigments, in
order to get a red amoena, you have to keep those pigments in the falls
and knock out both in the standards.

Which means combining at least two different genetic patterns - one for
the yellows and one for the blues.  And hope that they will combine
without interfering with each other.   There are a lot of blue amoenas
and a lot of yellow amoenas, but until recently (I think?) there weren't
as many widely available good growing, cooperatively fertile (well, at
least in some parts of irisdom) yellow amoenas to work with.

So I don't think there are a lot of them.  Maybe by saying that, I'll
trigger some responses from people who know more about the subject.

I didn't look at Griff's red amoena pedigree to see how he did it.

Wouldn't surprise me if Ghio, Keppel, and Blyth have red amoenas in
their seedling patches.  Especially Ghio.

--
Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
East Tennessee Iris Society <http://www.korrnet.org/etis>
American Iris Society web site <http://www.irises.org>
talk archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-talk/>
photos archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-photos/>
online R&I <http://www.irisregister.com>

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