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building up sand for iris culture
iris@hort.net
  • Subject: building up sand for iris culture
  • From: Eugene Baxley <baxleyeugene@yahoo.com>
  • Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2012 17:27:40 -0700 (PDT)

    Sand will not hold nutrients and it won't holdmuch water. It will sift
right through. Sand soil needs humus added to grow iris. Humas can be added by
adding a good potting soil to the plant site or adding peat moss. Peat moss
will hold water so it will hold some nutrients if they are water soluble and
added through watering of the plants. Pat Moss will also add nutrients to the
soil as it rots. You can add well rotted leaves or well rotted horse manure or
well rotted cotten hulls if available. There are other materials that are
peculiar to any area that will do the job. Peanut hulls are used in Georgia.
The left over mash used to make whiskey makes good humas. All plant material
used for humas in sand or any other soil must be aged and well rotted.
    Find what is available in your area and add some to build up the humas in
the sand before planting the iris.
    It seems to me that the person with the
sandy soil problem needs to build up sufficient soil elsewhere then move the
iris to the new area. Then, of course, build up the old area for future iris
plantings. 
 
    E. Baxley

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