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Re: Louisianas- Favorites? and Rebloomers?


Donald Mosser wrote:
> ...Could I persuade you seasoned growers of Louisianas (LA's?) to share your opinions about what you consider to be the all time best 
LA's and why, especially for the southeastern United States?  

> Donald, My seasoned response to your question would be for following list of good LA's.  Red Echo-Rowlan 84, Ann Chowning-Chowning 77, 
Buxom-Dunn 80, Black Gamecock-Chowning 80, Rhett-Dunn 83, Godzilla-Durio 
87, Coorabell-Raabe 88, Back Widow-MacMillan 53, Full Eclipse-Hager 78, 
Clara Goula-Anry 75, Southern Lady-Dunn 84, Parade Music-Morgan 84, Aunt 
Shirley-Mertzwiller 90. 

 Is there such a thing as a reblooming LA?  If there are such creatures 
are they worth the garden space? In other words, how do they stack up 
against non-reblooming LA's for color selection and vigor?
> There are a few LA's that have been known to rebloom.  Red Echo, Blue 
Duke, Urraba Gold.  They are just the same as the once bloomers.  
Remember tho, that some of the new ones are Tets, which means there is a 
chance they might be hard to grow.  Full sun, plenty of moisture in the 
spring, and plenty of good "stuff" for them to eat (they are heavy 
feeders) and they should do fine in your area.

Hope this helps, and Good luck!

Dennis Stoneburner  drstone@roanoke.infi.net












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