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Re: bone meal, rot

>First off, I thought it was Potash (K) that was good for roots, as in
>N (Nitrogen):  shoots
>P (Phosphorus):  blooms
>K (Potassium):  roots / cold-heat tolerance
>So much is focussed on the first two, relatively little on the last.
>N is found in abundance in blood meal, P in bone meal:
>Am I wrong in this?  I can definitely relate that if the plant doesn't
>have to work very hard to obtain essential nutrients, it might get
>fat & lazy and thus susceptible to disease, as we humans are.  Or
>perhaps the excess nutrients are toxic to the mycorhizae?

My brain misfired - I was thinking about mycorhizae, which the plants use in
order to extract phosphorus from soil when it is not readily available, and
since the mycorhizae are on the roots, I just got a liddle addled.  I don't
think the excess nutrients (phosphorus) are toxic to the mycorhizae, but
don't know enough to answer your question.  If there is plenty of phosphorus
available, plant roots are less likely to have mycorhizae, even though there
are plenty of mycorhizal spores handy. 

I thought I saw some bone meal for sale once that listed fairly high nitrogen
as well as phosphorus.

Linda Mann lmann76543@aol.com east TN USA

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