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TB: stalk height (was bloom report)

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: TB: stalk height (was bloom report)
  • From: Linda Mann <lmann@icx.net>
  • Date: Wed, 3 Jun 1998 20:55:33 -0600 (MDT)

Donald Eaves in Texas wrote:
> I'm wondering what the all the factors are which
> contribute
> to stalk height.  Mine never reach listed heights.

Three dominant factors here are winter/spring roller coaster freezes,
temperature, water.  When the weather is cool(60s and 70s) and damp
(cloudy, regular rain) and the cultivars are resistant to roller coaster
freeze damage, stalks go Jack and the Beanstalk mode.  However, most are
usually affected by the freezes here.  Some seem to be vulnerable all
winter/spring, some seem to escape most years, unless they get hit at
just the wrong time.  BAYBERRY CANDLE has bloomed pretty normally from
the time I first got it several years back, but was very stunted this
year.

There are probably other things affecting stalk height, but these are
the ones I see year to year.  

Linda Mann east Tennessee USA
record heat in Chattanooga last few days - upper 90s broke the record
set in the 1870s, I think I heard them say.  miserable muggy moldy
mildewy humid hot.....one Japanese seedling open this am - beautiful
thing out in the gravel pile.  The ones in the good soil haven't opened
yet.






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