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CULT- rot

  • Subject: CULT- rot
  • From: "beartowncbr" <beartown@acbm.qc.ca>
  • Date: Sat, 18 May 2002 13:35:22 -0000

I have not been on an iris list for a few years. Maybe this subject 
has been discussed and I am not using the correct keywords for the 
archives.
I have almost given up on growing TB's. First there was the incident 
last spring. Just before the first buds opened, my father backed a 
trailer load of wood into my wonderful iris from the Spoons. He got 
stuck and spun his way out. I saved only 1/2 dozen small rhizomes 
from the mush that resulted. This spring we had temps in the 70's & 
80's in March which started the iris growing. Then the weather turned 
very cold & there is frost damage & rot everywhere.

Digging up several old clumps (Olympic Challenge/Soft Jazz,etc.)
overgrown with grass, I noticed that there was no damage, no rot. 
Rhizomes were buried at least an inch in the ground. Beautiful. My 
carefully weeded beds are a mess of brown leaves & rot. The soil 
freezes & thaws so the rhizomes also wind up over an inch in the 
ground. Has anyone had experience growing other stuff interplanted 
with the iris to keep the soil dryer? My other idea was to make 
raised gravel beds as the Soft Jazz planted that way is looking very 
good.
P.S. The garden is on the crest of a hill, soil is mostly gravel. Too 
wet conditions are seldom a problem. Zone 4b
Adrienne



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