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unknown iris


Can anyone help me identify this iris.  It has 3-4 blooms per stalk, 29-30 "
tall and the first to bloom in the garden.  I would appreciate any help you
can give.


----- Original Message -----
From: "iris DIGEST" <iris-owner@hort.net>
To: <iris-digest@hort.net>
Sent: Saturday, May 22, 2004 11:45 AM
Subject: [iris] iris DIGEST V1 #3


>
> iris DIGEST           Saturday, May 22 2004           Volume 01 : Number
003
>
>
>
> In this issue:
>
>         [iris] Re: HYB: Mariposa Skies
>         Re: [iris] OT-Bio   Bob & Sandra
>         [iris] Re: HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>         [iris] Re: HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>         Re: [iris] CHAT: attn Mike G
>         [iris] Re: HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>         Re: [iris] OT-Bio   Bob & Sandra
>         [iris] Re: SIB Sea Shadows
>         Re: [iris] HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>         Re: [iris] Re: HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>         [iris] Re: HYB: breeding historic type iris
>         [iris] CULT: garden conditions (was breeding historics
>         Re: [iris] Re: SIB Sea Shadows
>         [iris] Exciting crosses - rot
>         [iris] Schreiner blues
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 21 May 2004 12:49:42 -0400
> From: Linda Mann <lmann@volfirst.net>
> Subject: [iris] Re: HYB: Mariposa Skies
>
> > this year is MARIPOSA SKIES
>
> I killed MP several years ago, but after noticing the pedigree, decided
> to give it another try last fall.  It did manage to bloom this year
> (along with a lot of other things I thought had died long ago!), & while
> it isn't very happy about being here, and made no pollen, it did set a
> pod crossed back to frozen VIOLET MIRACLE pollen.  Not necessarily
> trying to get rebloom, just a good, healthy neglecta or amoena & with a
> little luck, slightly wider petals than VM.
>
> This is a pod I expect to lose to stalk rot before it matures, but the
> forecast is for it to maybe quit raining every day late next week, & it
> hasn't rotted yet....
>
> - --
> Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
> East Tennessee Iris Society <http://www.korrnet.org/etis>
> American Iris Society web site <http://www.irises.org>
> talk archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-talk/>
> photos archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-photos/>
> online R&I <http://www.irisregister.com>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 21 May 2004 12:29:58 -0400
> From: "Bob and Sandra" <crusher4@wnclink.com>
> Subject: Re: [iris] OT-Bio   Bob & Sandra
>
> John & Char,
>
> Thanks for asking which fungicide to use Char.  John this one sounds like
> the one for me.  This one work good for Roses too.Thanks.
>
> Could anyone tell me how to raise Iris in zone 10.  And let me know were
to
> purchase the correct Iris for this zone.  Have a friend that wanted me to
> find out.  Any help will be appreciated.
>
>       I learned something neat from  a friend so thought I would share it
> with gardening  friends.
>       If you like Gerber Daisy's this is really neat info on starting them
> from seed.
>
>             I thought you guys would might find this useful: OK I have
been
> running a seed production experiment on my gerber daisys. I have a
neighbor
> whom I just met recently and she grows gerbers and I finally got the nerve
> to approach her and get some tips on raising them. What she told me is, if
I
> want my gerbers to produce more viable seed I need to remove all the
petals
> of my flower after it's spent. let the center finish drying on the plant
and
> just before the fluff blows away cut it and separate the seeds from the
> fluff. I did just that, except I did one leaving all the petals and one I
> removed them. I did this two differant times over the last month. the
first
> time I got zero viable seeds on the one I left the petals on and 26 on the
> one where I removed them. Second time which was today I have 3 viable on
the
> flower with petals and 31 on the flower head without petals. Maybe it's a
> fluke but I'm going with it and since this neighbor is an expert growing
> them I think I I'll definnately keep removing the petals once spent. She
has
> rows of really nice ones and she told me she has either bought them when
> they are .25 and .50 at places like k-mart or walmart but mainly she
> cultivates the seed and shares with family and friends. I'm hoping to
become
> her friend. LOL, Give it a try.
>
>             Going to try it with my Gerber Daisy's this year when they go
to
> seed.  Hope this is alright to share this here.  Sandra
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> - ----- Original Message -----
> From: "John Reeds" <lamegardener@msn.com>
> To: <iris@hort.net>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2004 11:55 PM
> Subject: Re: [iris] OT-Bio Bob & Sandra
>
>
> > J
> >   Hi John,
> >   Could you be specific on what fungicides to use?
> >   Thanks, Char New Berlin, WI
> >
> >   As I said, most fungicides will work.  I use Green Light "Fung-away",
I
> > don't know the chemical, because (1) it works pretty good and (2) it
goes
> on
> > clear.  Most fungicides (like Ortho - which seems to be the only brand
> Home
> > Depot carries) seem to have a talc base which leaves beige waterspots on
> the
> > leaves; seems to me eliminating brown spots on the leaves is the whole
> purpose
> > for spraying...duh!  So, I like the clear stuff.  It is also
competitively
> > priced.  Green Light also sold the only effective red spider mite spray
> (based
> > on Kelthane) until they took it off the home gardener market and
replaced
> it
> > with a useless product based on pyrethrins or neem oil or something like
> > that.
> >
> >   John Reeds
> >   lamegardener@msn.com
> >   zone 9b southern CA
> >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 21 May 2004 13:38:54 -0400
> From: "Neil A Mogensen" <neilm@charter.net>
> Subject: [iris] Re: HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>
> Dave, the question about breeding for historic type iris was put to
Dorothy
> Stiefel, HIPS NE Director, who lives in Spencer, NY (Zone 4/5).  She does
not
> say from whom the question was received.
>
> Linda Mann in zone 7/8 near Knoxville, TN, has a similar interest.  Her
(and
> my) problem with modern cultivars has to do more with quick switches from
heat
> to frost during winter and early spring (March, more or less) months and
the
> ability of cultivars to withstand these and to bloom--two different
problems.
> Genetically, the ability to survive and the ability to bloom despite these
> reversals seems to be separate issues.  Linda, in a grim humor, describes
her
> conditions as the "Vale of Despair" and applies the term to a broad swath
of
> the continent that has related issues.
>
> In western North Carolina mountains, not far south and slightly east of
Linda,
> I have the advantage of a site with good air drainage.  Linda lives along
a
> creek trace, but has a new garden gradually being developed in a cleared
site
> in woodland above her home on a ridge.
>
> One factor she and I share is the contrast of soil quality from ridge to
> creek.  High ground is composed of deeply eroded red clays, with creek
level
> soil a mix of silts with gravels.  The latter typically also has a high
water
> table.  Linda's low ground is ideal for Louisianas, daylilies and a native
> chrysanthemum, a common weed.  The high ground resembles areas cleared in
TN
> and western NC woods for marijuana production, so has frequent federal
> oversight.  Both of us suffer from drought or deluge, depending on the El
> Nino/La Nina cycle, as do you.  Currently we seem to be in the daily rain
> aspect of the cycle in our half of the continent.
>
> Like for you, historic diploids thrive here when left undisturbed.  The
> 'Perfection'-like tall diploid I sent you loves it here, as does the short
> *pallida*-bloom/*variegata*-stemmed clone I have--and sent--from one of my
> step-sons in WI.  'Pink Ruffles,' one of the late (1940-ish) diploid
> pallida-pinks I have from Linda Mann is slowly getting  established and
> growing happily but not forming much of a clump as yet.  These are the
only
> non-species clones I have other than Peyrard's first generation hybrid
between
> *timofejewii* and *variegata* which is developing into quite a clump now.
It
> has an astonishingly long season of bloom through a succession of
bloomstalks
> put up over a period of time, a quality I would like to see in modern
> tetraploids.
>
> Neil Mogensen  z 7 (sorta) in western NC mountains
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 21 May 2004 15:21:22 -0400
> From: "Neil A Mogensen" <neilm@charter.net>
> Subject: [iris] Re: HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>
> El Niqo and La Niqa.  Learned how to do something.
>
> Neil Mogensen
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 21 May 2004 13:45:06 -0700
> From: John I Jones <jijones@usjoneses.com>
> Subject: Re: [iris] CHAT: attn Mike G
>
> Folks,
>
> If email you send privately to someone is bouncing, then it is very
> likely that list mail is bouncing from them as well (most people use
> the same address for the list as their private mail.)
>
> If you think they have a separate address for list mail, go into the
> list archives (or your own trash  or archives folders) search for them
> by name  (or view the archives by sender) and check their address on
> their most recent post. If it is the same one that is bouncing for you,
> then they won't get list mail either.
>
> Thx
>
>
> John                | "There be dragons here"
>                           |  Annotation used by ancient cartographers
>                           |  to indicate the edge of the known world.
>
> List owner iris@hort.net and iris-photos@yahoogroups.com
> ________________________________________________
> USDA zone 8/9 (coastal, bay)
> Fremont, California, USA
> Director, American Iris Society
> Chairman, AIS Committee for Electronic Member Services
>
> Online Iris Checklists at: http://www.irisregister.com
>
> Subscribe to iris@hort.net by sending:
> Subscribe iris
> To: majordomo@hort.net
> Archives at: http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-talk/
>
> Subscribe to iris-photos at:
> http://yahoogroups.com/subscribe/iris-photos
> Archives at:http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-photos/
> ________________________________________________
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 21 May 2004 19:09:41 -0400
> From: "Neil A Mogensen" <neilm@charter.net>
> Subject: [iris] Re: HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>
> Aaaargh.  Those "q" characters were "enyas" when they went out.  Something
> went awry in translation.
>
> Rats!
>
> Neil Mogensen
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 21 May 2004 17:01:54 -0700
> From: "John Reeds" <lamegardener@msn.com>
> Subject: Re: [iris] OT-Bio   Bob & Sandra
>
> Where is your zone 10?  The high temperatures and humidity are more
important
> than the lows once you get out of the "frozen tundra" climates.  Iris are
> remarkably adaptable and only the extremes are really a problem for most.
> Unfortunately, USDA zones only reflect the low temperatures.  For zone 10
that
> probably means no winter freezes, so siberians (and many dwarf beardeds
and
> japanese) are unlikely to thrive.  In 9b I love Ghio iris, Hagar things,
some
> Keppels, some V. Woods, many Schreiners (but not their lacy things or most
of
> their neglectas; both may need a winter freeze to really thrive).  Many
Ernst
> and Sutton things do well here, but are not my favorites.  Recent Blyth
iris
> are exceptional; I had less luck with his earlier introductions.  A few of
my
> favorites are Louisa's Song, Epicenter, Double Click, Timescape,
Valentines
> Day,... this is just a start.
>
> John Reeds
> lamegardener@msn.com
> San Juan Capistrano, CA 9b
>   ----- Original Message -----
>   From: Bob and Sandra
>   To: iris@hort.net
>   Sent: Friday, May 21, 2004 9:29 AM
>   Subject: Re: [iris] OT-Bio Bob & Sandra
>
>
>   John & Char,
>
>   Thanks for asking which fungicide to use Char.  John this one sounds
like
>   the one for me.  This one work good for Roses too.Thanks.
>
>   Could anyone tell me how to raise Iris in zone 10.  And let me know were
to
>   purchase the correct Iris for this zone.  Have a friend that wanted me
to
>   find out.  Any help will be appreciated.
>
>         I learned something neat from  a friend so thought I would share
it
>   with gardening  friends.
>         If you like Gerber Daisy's this is really neat info on starting
them
>   from seed.
>
>               I thought you guys would might find this useful: OK I have
been
>   running a seed production experiment on my gerber daisys. I have a
neighbor
>   whom I just met recently and she grows gerbers and I finally got the
nerve
>   to approach her and get some tips on raising them. What she told me is,
if
> I
>   want my gerbers to produce more viable seed I need to remove all the
petals
>   of my flower after it's spent. let the center finish drying on the plant
> and
>   just before the fluff blows away cut it and separate the seeds from the
>   fluff. I did just that, except I did one leaving all the petals and one
I
>   removed them. I did this two differant times over the last month. the
first
>   time I got zero viable seeds on the one I left the petals on and 26 on
the
>   one where I removed them. Second time which was today I have 3 viable on
> the
>   flower with petals and 31 on the flower head without petals. Maybe it's
a
>   fluke but I'm going with it and since this neighbor is an expert growing
>   them I think I I'll definnately keep removing the petals once spent. She
> has
>   rows of really nice ones and she told me she has either bought them when
>   they are .25 and .50 at places like k-mart or walmart but mainly she
>   cultivates the seed and shares with family and friends. I'm hoping to
> become
>   her friend. LOL, Give it a try.
>
>               Going to try it with my Gerber Daisy's this year when they
go
> to
>   seed.  Hope this is alright to share this here.  Sandra
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>   ----- Original Message -----
>   From: "John Reeds" <lamegardener@msn.com>
>   To: <iris@hort.net>
>   Sent: Wednesday, May 19, 2004 11:55 PM
>   Subject: Re: [iris] OT-Bio Bob & Sandra
>
>
>   > J
>   >   Hi John,
>   >   Could you be specific on what fungicides to use?
>   >   Thanks, Char New Berlin, WI
>   >
>   >   As I said, most fungicides will work.  I use Green Light
"Fung-away", I
>   > don't know the chemical, because (1) it works pretty good and (2) it
goes
>   on
>   > clear.  Most fungicides (like Ortho - which seems to be the only brand
>   Home
>   > Depot carries) seem to have a talc base which leaves beige waterspots
on
>   the
>   > leaves; seems to me eliminating brown spots on the leaves is the whole
>   purpose
>   > for spraying...duh!  So, I like the clear stuff.  It is also
> competitively
>   > priced.  Green Light also sold the only effective red spider mite
spray
>   (based
>   > on Kelthane) until they took it off the home gardener market and
replaced
>   it
>   > with a useless product based on pyrethrins or neem oil or something
like
>   > that.
>   >
>   >   John Reeds
>   >   lamegardener@msn.com
>   >   zone 9b southern CA
>   >
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 22 May 2004 00:53:25 -0500
> From: "Char Holte" <cholte@wi.rr.com>
> Subject: [iris] Re: SIB Sea Shadows
>
> HI,
>
> Does anyone have a picture of this SIB?
>
> Char, New Berlin, WI
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 21 May 2004 15:40:17 -0600
> From: DFerguson@cabq.gov
> Subject: Re: [iris] HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>
> Noticed an "oops" in my first note.  I said the following:
>
>  "match the edging in color, and they are
> quite pretty little flowers.  The pink or blue may be very pale or very
> light, so the range of colors is quite wide for a species."
>
> That should be "may be very pale to fairly dark".
>
> Was one of those good 'ol cut and paste errors.
>
> Dave
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Fri, 21 May 2004 15:49:50 -0600
> From: DFerguson@cabq.gov
> Subject: Re: [iris] Re: HIST: breeding historic type Iris
>
> Figured I'd send this off-group.
>
> The plants you sent didn't flower this year, but I'm anxiously waiting.  I
> need to double check all of them, but believe all are still growing and
> healthy.
>
> Seems I owe you some Iris.  I think I was going to send some I.
> missouriensis to try last year, but we never got it done.  I wanted to see
> if sometime soon would be good to send them.  I think spring is the best
> time to transplant them.  The little starts I have in my garden are done
> flowering, but the ones in the mountains nearby should be in full flower
> and growing strongly now.  Should be a good year, we've had more rain than
> usual early in the year.
>
> When I send them, I'll violate cleanliness protocols and leave them in
> dirt.  They tend to occur in bricks of native soil, and transplant better
> if you don't break the dirt off.  That means you could get some
interesting
> NM hitchhikers too.  If you want them clean, I can do that too; I'll just
> have to try to treat them gently.
>
>
> Dave
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 22 May 2004 07:39:20 -0400
> From: Linda Mann <lmann@volfirst.net>
> Subject: [iris] Re: HYB: breeding historic type iris
>
> I don't grow many diploids or germanica 44 chromosome type irises here,
> but a couple of comments about them.
>
> The pallida group has wonderfully healthy foliage here usually, but
> unlike the variegata group, they tend to bloom very early here.  Their
> bloom is particularly sensitive to late winter/early spring damage here,
> where temperature swings can sometimes be extreme.  The timing of bloom
> seems to vary among locations/climate/soil - some folks have said their
> pallidas bloom late.  When they do bloom well here, they are usually
> quite tall.
>
> The variegata group blooms towards the end of tall bearded bloom
> season.  I've never seen bloom affected by late freezes, but it doesn't
> appreciate the heat and drought in the gravel soil here.  They are
> usually very short here.
>
> Variegata, pallida, and germanica are highly tolerant of a lot of
> rainfall and accidental mulch.  I have them growing around the house
> where they runoff get from my roof (no gutters) and tree leaves that are
> blown in or fall on the roof and wash down onto them.
>
> I have several of the pallida x variegata types that Dave mentions -
> most of them bloom late enough to avoid freezing out, and early enough
> to keep from being totally fried by heat and drought.  They do seem to
> resent the drought - don't seem to have the root system to handle
> growing out in the gravel when it's hot and dry.  Most are short.  The
> exception being the  very tall, very late stripy unknown that Neil and I
> see everywhere in our neighborhoods.
>
> Neil, did you send a start of that one to Dave?  Maybe he can figure out
> what it is if it will live for him.
> - --
> Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
> East Tennessee Iris Society <http://www.korrnet.org/etis>
> American Iris Society web site <http://www.irises.org>
> talk archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-talk/>
> photos archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-photos/>
> online R&I <http://www.irisregister.com>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 22 May 2004 07:52:06 -0400
> From: Linda Mann <lmann@volfirst.net>
> Subject: [iris] CULT: garden conditions (was breeding historics
>
> A couple of comments about my garden(s).  My main garden is old creek
> colluvium (i.e., an erratic distribution of rocks, gravel, sand, and
> even some clay) and is naturally very fertile and high in organic
> matter.  It is about 20 ft elevation above the main stream.   The water
> table is normally at least 10 ft below the surface, but when we have
> major storm systems that dump 10 inches of rain in less than a week, the
> hills behind my house become saturated and my entire yard and garden can
> be below the water table!  That rarely happens, fortunately, and is
> usually a winter event.  The water moves thru the gravel so fast, it
> doesn't seem to bother the plants at all - including Oriental poppies,
> which are notoriously picky about drainage in our climate, and thrive
> here.
>
> The field where the garden is located slopes gradually down to a major
> stream. Next to the main channel, there are some low boggy areas about 5
> ft above the usual surface of the stream that are flooded several times
> a year, often have standing water, are mostly silt and clay and an ideal
> location for Louisianas.
>
> The ridge top "garden" is a mess.  A ragged opening in the woods is a
> better description. It was a cornfield in the early 1950s, a pine stand
> until a few years ago when the pine beetles killed the trees.  The soil
> is well drained clay, naturally low in nutrients and organic matter, (so
> I get to add what I want) has great air drainage & sun exposure, none of
> the drought /disease problems I see in the gravel garden (yet?).  I
> hired a bulldozer to push enough of the fallen trees out of the way to
> be able to get the tractor in and plow a few rows to plant with irises.
> Not much room there, and surrounding dead pines are still coming down.
> I'm using it to see how my seedlings will grow under more favorable
> conditions and to get pods and viable pollen on things too fussy to
> cooperate here at the house.  It has also turned out to be a good way to
> get some extra matchups with fresh pollen between the two, since some
> things bloom quite a bit earlier there.
>
> But the main garden will always be here at the house - the goal of my
> pollen daubing is to breed seedlings that will thrive under my difficult
> growing conditions here.  But the ridgetop is invaluable for evaluating
> seedling potential and for some daubing.
>
> - --
> Linda Mann east Tennessee USA zone 7/8
> East Tennessee Iris Society <http://www.korrnet.org/etis>
> American Iris Society web site <http://www.irises.org>
> talk archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-talk/>
> photos archives: <http://www.hort.net/lists/iris-photos/>
> online R&I <http://www.irisregister.com>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 22 May 2004 07:47:35 -0700
> From: "Hensler" <hensler@povn.com>
> Subject: Re: [iris] Re: SIB Sea Shadows
>
> Char,
>
> I have a good photo of Sea Shadows. Sending it off-list didn't work so if
> you are a member of iris-photos I'll send it there.
>
> Christy
>
> Skip & Christy Hensler
> THE ROCK GARDEN
> Newport, WA
> http://www.povn.com/rock/
> - ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Char Holte" <cholte@wi.rr.com>
>
>
> > Does anyone have a picture of this SIB?
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 22 May 2004 11:42:24 EDT
> From: Bzzscheile@aol.com
> Subject: [iris] Exciting crosses - rot
>
> Never again will I let rot run its course.  I lost about 75% of my iris a
few
> years back when I did that.  By the time I decided there was more going on
> than bacterial rot, it was too late for most.  What pitiful remains there
were I
> dug up.  Then I treated all my growing area with terrachlor.  I replanted
the
> "plugs" in the same soil and then ordered quite a few new ones.  Any rot I
> enountered after that I treated immediately with bacterial soap.  I didn't
loose
> one iris the next year.  This year is my first year for really good bloom.
> Am still trying to identifiy the "plugs" that have grown into clumps.  The
> crosses that I am most excited about are my PCI crosses.  Next in line is
Round
> Tuit crosses.  This is a Tom Burseen iris and I don't know why he didn't
work
> more with that iris and told him so more than once.  It is well named
being
> almost perfectly round in the falls.  Another really good and faithful TB
TB iris
> (Tom Burseen Tall Bearded) is Where There is Smoke.  I can't think of any
way
> to improve on it though unless to make it a little shorter so have never
put
> pollen on it.  My third bunch of crosses I am interested in are crosses to
Gina
> the Gypsy.  Two big fat pods on it.  I don't really keep up with the
pollen
> parent as I only hybridize to get iris that grow good in my garden and to
heck
> with the rest of the world.  I am not as nimble as I once was and want
only
> good growers and bloomers although I admit to coddling one here and there.
> Barbara Null
> Tyler, TX  zone 7b/8a
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date: Sat, 22 May 2004 11:45:53 EDT
> From: Bzzscheile@aol.com
> Subject: [iris] Schreiner blues
>
> I am catching up on old posts and in regards to Linda Mann's post on
> Schreiner blues, I can't believe your weather is that much different from
mine.  Ride
> the Wind, Sierra Grande and Yaquini Blue all perform well for me as does
the
> "perfect" blue iris Victoria Falls.
> Barbara Null
> Tyler, TX
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of iris DIGEST V1 #3
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>
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