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Re: OT - "Gerber" Daisies


Hi Kitty,

I found out some info on Gerber Daisy for you.  Seems they originate in
South Africa.  From personal experience in Bradenton, Fla. They bloomed
great in the shade under a tree.  It wasn't dence shade but they were
shaded.  This is the first year I've put mine out in full sun had them in
partial shade until this year.  When I came across this info below.  Seems
they perfer full sun.  And South Africa must have as hot a temps as you do.

Location
The gerber daisy is native to the Transvaal region of South Africa.

Culture
This long-rooted plant likes deep, well-drained loam or sandy soil. Plant
about 1 foot apart in beds. Fertilize frequently throughout summer to
encourage blooming. Soggy conditions and soil in the crown will cause
gerbers to rot - do not plant too deeply.
Light: Full sun. Will tolerate light shade.
Moisture: Water during dry periods.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 9 - 11. Can tolerate some frost but freezing
temperatures will kill plant to the roots. Gerber daisies are becoming
popular with gardeners in colder zones where they are grown in the garden as
an annual or dug up, potted, and overwintered indoors.
Propagation: Propagate by division of clumps. Seeds will work too, but
plants will vary wildly in form and color.

----- Original Message -----
From: "Lobergs" <loberg@adelphia.net>
To: <iris@hort.net>
Sent: Wednesday, May 26, 2004 12:24 AM
Subject: Re: [iris] OT - "Gerber" Daisies


> Sandra,
>    I went on GardenWeb to see what more I found about Gerber/Gerbera
> daisies, and found some discussion saying they don't like temperatures
above
> 70 degrees, or they may quit blooming.   Is this true? and am I doomed,
> because summer is coming and I'll get 100 degrees easily.  It says they
like
> lots of sun, and I have no sun indoors... so what do I do?
> Kitty
>
> > > Yes Arnold same daisy.  Love them.  Sandra
>
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