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RE: variegata and west coast USA


Linda,

I don't have all the Dykes but we went through the freeze-thaw cycles
last year.  There wasn't much rot.  I can say that the best performers
were not Dykes medallists.  I'll have to check my notes on each of the
Dykes winners and let you know.

Maureen Mark
Ottawa, Canada (zone 4)

> -----Original Message-----
> From:	Mike Sutton [SMTP:suttons@lightspeed.net]
> Sent:	Monday, May 04, 1998 9:54 AM
> To:	Multiple recipients of list
> Subject:	Re: variegata and west coast USA
> 
> > Is there some documentation of performance in different climates and
> > after late freezes for all the Dykes winners?  I guess I should say
> > rollercoaster freezes - freezes below 20o F after prolonged
> > above-freezing temperatures.  Anybody on list have a complete
> collection
> > of Dykes medalists that got frozen badly this year?  Or if you know
> > someone off-list who does who'd be willing to evaluate freeze injury
> and
> > subsequent bloom, rot etc for me, send me an address off-list and I
> will
> > write.
> > 
> > Although as Anner points out, the Dykes medallists are really chosen
> for
> > their uniqueness, they wind up being used more than anything else in
> > subsequent breeding.  Seems like.  Most of the time.
> > 
> > Linda Mann east Tennessee USA





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