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Re: Cult: Multi-socketing

Hi John,
I have been seeing quite a bit of that this year also.  I think that
hybridizers are breeding for it and it is starting to carry through more
and more.  Several of our intros this year have been triple socketed on the
terminal and side branches.  (Heartbreak Hotel, Thunderball and September
Frost).  I've noticed that some of Schreiner's 97 intros did the same
thing.  You and I are both in the same USDA zone so maybe it's just the
weather.  We do breed for it though.
Mike Sutton

> From: John I. Jones <jijones@ix.netcom.com>
> To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
> Subject: Cult: Multi-socketing
> Date: Saturday, May 16, 1998 7:29 AM
> Seems to me that I am seeing a large number of triple socketing this
> (meaning 3 flowers out of one socket instead of the usual 1 or 2)
> Anybody know if this is a genetic trait, cultural, or weather related? I
> remember seeing any last year, but then I might not have been noticing
> (Takes a long time for some of us to become observant)
> I have seen it in a number of terminal points and a few side branches.
> John                     | "There be dragons here"
>                          |  Annotation used by ancient cartographers
>                          |  to indicate the edge of the known world.
> John Jones, jijones@ix.netcom.com
> Fremont, California, USA, Earth, USDA zone 8/9 (coastal, bay) 
> Max high 95F/35C, Min Low 28F/-2C average 10 days each
> Heavy clay base for my raised beds.
> There are currently 83 Iris pictures on my Website. Visit me at:
> http://members.home.net/jijones

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