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Re: A question from a novice

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: Re: A question from a novice
  • From: Irisborer <Irisborer@AOL.COM>
  • Date: Tue, 19 May 1998 03:18:23 -0600 (MDT)

In a message dated 98-05-18 22:26:54 EDT, you write:

> After the blooms have passed
>and the stalks develop the pods, should I prune them?
>
>I would appreciate the recommendations of the list users.

Hi Mark

Kathyguest here in the Buffalo area.  You don't mention your location so I'll
give a generic answer on cutting back irises.  Don't.

The scoop is, you should never cut back healthy green iris foliage until
Thanksgiving or so (in the north), and that's for self-preservation.

As long as iris foliage is green it's collecting energy for the strength of
the plant and for next year's bloom.  

If the foliage becomes diseased, however - or if you have dead leaves lying
around, by all means, cut it back and get rid of the debris (at the curb, not
the compost).

But on the other hand, if you've been growing them for 15 years, I guess
you're doing OK!  (:

As for the pods..... creating a pod takes lots of energy for your plant.  If
you're not planning to plant seeds, I would suggest snapping off the
bloomstalk right after bloom.

Kathy Guest
E. Aurora, NY





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