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Re: Walking iris/ vesper iris

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: Re: Walking iris/ vesper iris
  • From: "william b. cook" <billc@atlantic.net>
  • Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 17:11:39 -0600 (MDT)

Teresa,

> What can anyone tell me about these irises?  I have heard the vesper 
> looks like an orchid and the walking iris name has me curious.  Also, 
> does anyone have any they would be willing to sell a little of?
> Thanks,  Teresa
> zone 5 south of Kansas City  KS

     I have two types of Walking Irises.  One is a purple/white bicolor,
and the other is yellow with some brownish dots.  Both are pretty.  For
both types, after they bloom, they form babies on the stems where the
blooms were, similar to that of a Spider Plant.  These are easy to start
and grow into new plants.
     In your climate, you would have to grow them in pots, and overwinter
them in a bright, sunny, south-facing room in your house.  The Yellow type
is hardy here, and the purple/white type has to have some freeze protection
here.
     Some of this year's crop of babies is spoken for, but it looks like I
will have more to spare if you are interested.  

Mark A. Cook
billc@atlantic.net
Dunnellon, Florida.	USDA Zone 8/9  [95 F]  





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