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Re: SPEC: I. versicolor cultivation

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: Re: SPEC: I. versicolor cultivation
  • From: "J. Michael, Celia or Ben Storey" <storey@aristotle.net>
  • Date: Thu, 28 May 1998 16:53:50 -0600 (MDT)

Howdy, all!

Bill Shear's post on versicolor hybrids reminds me to ask y'all for
assistance interpreting the behavior of my one darling versicolor, CAT
MOUSAM.

This elegant plant bloomed for almost three weeks this year, it's maiden
year in my garden. The last flower faded Monday. At the time Arkansas was
suffering from moderate drought, with temps banging well into the 90s daily
and only dropping to the mid-70s by night. We'd received no rain in three
weeks, during which time I ensured that CAT MOUSAM and its heavily-mulched
bedmates -- two great-looking LAs, some anemic alstromeria and one
extremely happy I. nelsonii -- all received more than an inch of hose water
a week.

Wednesday I noticed short, irregular tan stripes all over the CAT MOUSAM
leaves, which had looked wonderful before bloom. These mars don't look like
leaf spot; they look like stress. I suppose it might be the heat, but --
here is my question -- might it be sunburn? That area gets morning sun,
midday shade and then afternoon sun. I can do nothing about the heat but I
can block the sun if necessary.

What would sunburn on versicolor look like? And have any other Southern
gardeners seen the damage I describe? Is it something to worry about?

Such a graceful little plant one is loath to lose.

celia
storey@aristotle.net
Little Rock, Arkansas, USDA Zone 7b
-----------------------------------
257 feet above sea level,
average rainfall about 50 inches (more than 60" in '97)
average relative humidity (at 6 a.m.) 84%.
moderate winters, hot summers ... but lots of seesaw action in all seasons






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