hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

Re: HYB: deepening pink


Walter Moores wrote:
<Linda, would you say OVATION is a deep pink?  That is deep pink
in my eyes.  Also, the falls in MAGHAREE are a deep pink, at
least in my soil.>

Who knows <g> - OVATION is new this year, and MAGHAREE went to heaven
soon after arrival.  Never saw either one in person.  From the pictures,
OVATION looks very pink to my eye.  I guess I got a bit confused from
some earlier posts that said something about 'dark' pinks.  From the
post, I got the impression they were talking about pinks that were
'dark' because they had a lot of purple pigment in them?

Which got me thinking about pigments again - I think we went over this
once before but I'm a bit fuzzy on the subject.  <Presence or absence>
of pink/yellow is genetically controlled as is supression of blue.  Is
the <amount> of  pigment a simple dominant/recessive thing and is it
linked to the colors?  In other words, do you have to cross two deep
pinks to always get deep pinks?  Or could you get a deep pink by
crossing cultivars with a lot of some other pigment but with light
pink/yellow in the background?  I have a vague memory that the different
pigments don't even occur in the same part of the cells, in which case
'deepness' of one color shouldn't have any effect on another, except
thru combination of the two.

What about optical effects?  Do they have anything to do with deepness
of color?

Or are these more of my interminable unanswerable questions (which I
haven't had a lot of lately - I must have become a know it all <g>)?

It is COLD here!

Linda Mann east Tennseessee USA zone 7/8




-------------------------- eGroups Sponsor -------------------------~-~>
eGroups eLerts
It's Easy. It's Fun. Best of All, it's Free!
http://click.egroups.com/1/9698/0/_/486170/_/974886730/
---------------------------------------------------------------------_->







 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index