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Re: iris DIGEST V1 #226
iris@hort.net

Hi all

I had 2 crosses with worm eaten and pods starting to rot. I picked them, rinsed in mild bleach solution and put them into the fridge-burrito fashion. The first is from a Marty Richards cross and the seeds started to sprout in Sept. I planted them in a pot, in the ground in the garden-2 are up and now are 2 inches tall. I mulched them heavily with straw and plan to leave them there for the winter. The second is from a brown and orange seedling-they are on the kitchen counter now and are just starting to show roots. I am unsure what will happen if I put them out. Was wondering if I put them in a sheltered flower bed next to the house if they would survive. Would welcome any comments on this idea. I have had several dwarf crosses from last year that did not sprout till Sept also, in the garden and plan to leave them there with mulch. I have had dwarfs sprout like this in the past and they survived just fine.
Rose Kinnard
Zone 6
Frederricktown, Mo
----- Original Message ----- From: "iris DIGEST" <iris-owner@hort.net>
To: <iris-digest@hort.net>
Sent: Friday, November 08, 2013 11:45 AM
Subject: [iris] iris DIGEST V1 #226



iris DIGEST Friday, November 8 2013 Volume 01 : Number 226



In this issue:

Re: [iris] HYB: dry vs fresh seed germination NOW pink and other early germinants

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 13:02:49 -0500 (EST)
From: Betty Wilkerson <autmirislvr@aol.com>
Subject: Re: [iris] HYB: dry vs fresh seed germination NOW pink and other early germinants

I'm reminded that once again I have several seed from pink genes.  For
instance, there is 'About Tomorrow' X Cameo Blush.  (43 seed)  'About
Tomorrow' is a late bloomer, but has 'Treasured' as a parent.  Should I be
concerned that these seed are subject to early freeze as many pink crosses
are?





Betty Wilkerson
Zone 6 KY
autmirislvr@aol.com




- -----Original Message-----
From: Phloid <phloid@bellsouth.net>
To: iris <iris@hort.net>
Sent: Wed, Nov 6, 2013 11:12 am
Subject: Re: [iris] HYB: dry vs fresh seed germination


Seeds of many species vary in their germination habits even within the
same genus and species. Campanula spp range from very easy to germinate
to very difficult. With hybrid irises one might expect germination
habits to vary on similar basis as other genetic expressions. What holds
for one cross may not hold for another. Onward you brave explorers!!
Keep good notes!

Shaub

On 11/6/2013 10:02 AM, Betty Wilkerson wrote:
We've proven that most of the old recommendations aren't set in stone.
Does
that mean they are all wrong? With unprotected seed pots (mulch) seed often float to the top. I usually push them back into the soil, but I never know
if
they sprout since there are up to 35 seed in each pot. I don't have a way
of
identifying each seed in a cross so that I might have exact records. Maybe
planting seed in individual cells would satisfy that need?  So far, I've
not
tried that technique. Doubt I have enough interest to do it at this point.
I'll just accept what sprouts and let others worry about the details..


Did reealize that frig babies debunked the "three times diameter of the
seed"
rule.







Betty Wilkerson
Zone 6 KY
autmirislvr@aol.com




-----Original Message-----
From: Linda Mann <lmann@lock-net.com>
To: iris <iris@hort.net>
Sent: Tue, Nov 5, 2013 10:11 pm
Subject: Re: [iris] HYB: dry vs fresh seed germination


I've occasionally had seed germinate on top of the soil if they haven't
dried out.

& have had some that get mixed several inches deep by accident when
transplanting seedlings out of the germination pot come up the second year.

General planting directions for seeds usually say plant twice as deep as
the seeds' size.  So I try for about 1/4 inch of potting mix.

& of course, in the fridge, they aren't covered at all, except maybe by
misplaced bags of veggies ;-)  But at least it is dark in there most of
the time.

:-)

Linda Mann



------------------------------

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