hort.net Seasonal photo, (c) 2006 Christopher P. Lindsey, All Rights Reserved: do not copy
articles | gallery of plants | blog | tech blog | plant profiles | patents | mailing lists | top stories | links | shorturl service | tom clothier's archive0
 Navigation
Articles
Gallery of Plants
Blog
Tech Blog
Plant Profiles
Patents
Mailing Lists
    FAQ
    Netiquette
    Search ALL lists
    Search help
    Subscription info
Top Stories
Links
sHORTurl service
Tom Clothier's Archive
 Top Stories
Disease could hit Britain's trees hard

Ten of the best snowdrop cultivars

Plant protein database helps identify plant gene functions

Dendroclimatologists record history through trees

Potato beetle could be thwarted through gene manipulation

Hawaii expands coffee farm quarantine

Study explains flower petal loss

Unauthorized use of a plant doesn't invalidate it's patent

RSS story archive

The Impact of Cold Climate Rebloomers


In a message dated 96-11-26 20:37:58 EST, you write:

<< That goes for everyone else......as you can tell, I love to "Push" 
 medians.  I personally think they are the future and salvation of the 
 bearded iris.  TB's are history if trends continue.
  >>
 I would assert that the salvation of the tall bearded iris is the cold
climate rebloomer.  The work with cold climate rebloomers that Lloyd
Zurbrigg, G. Percy Brown, Raymond Smith, Earl Hall, Frank Jones and others
did over the past 40 years was done for the love of irises.  These iris
breeders received almost no recognition until recent times, and in fact, were
often the but of jokes by some famous, well known hybridizers.  (Ben Hager
has also been in the forefront of breeding and promoting cold climate
rebloomers, but his work in this area was never the source of his many
awards).  

In saying that cold climate rebloomers are the salvation of the tall bearded
irises, I do not mean that this is just because they rebloom.  Rather, it is
because of their genetic make-up which is heavy in its origins on I. trojana
and AMAS rather than the tender Ii. mesopotamica and cypriana.  Cold weather
rebloomers are hardy! 

A major shift in attitudes toward cold weather rebloomers occurred with Lloyd
Zurbrigg's introductions of BABY BLESSED and IMMORTALITY and with the work of
Monte Byers, under the tutelage of Ben Hager and Lloyd Zurbrigg.  Now, even
those West Coast hybridizers  who used to have nothing but disdain for cold
climate rebloomers are using them in their breeding programs.  And the
results of their breeding programs are going to be much more likely to grow
and thrive in the north and east than in the past.  Clarence Mahan in VA





 © 1995-2015 Mallorn Computing, Inc.All Rights Reserved.
Our Privacy Statement
Other Mailing lists | Author Index | Date Index | Subject Index | Thread Index