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Re: Southern hemisphere bloom


> Received: from MERCQ by WARTHOG (Mercury 1.21); 18 Nov 96 12:33:50 +200
> Return-path: <iris-l@rt66.com>
> Received: from hippo.ru.ac.za by warthog.ru.ac.za (Mercury 1.21);
>     18 Nov 96 12:33:41 +200
> Received: from Rt66.com [198.59.162.1] (root)
>     by hippo.ru.ac.za with smtp (Exim 1.58 #1)
>     id 0vPR1I-0007R7-00; Mon, 18 Nov 1996 12:33:41 +0200
> Received: from mack (server@mack.rt66.com [198.59.162.1]) by Rt66.com (8.7.5/8.7.3) with SMTP id DAA15180; Mon, 18 Nov 1996 03:33:57 -0700 (MST)
> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 1996 03:33:57 -0700 (MST)
> Message-Id: <961118053133_351101861@emout03.mail.aol.com>
> Errors-To: telp@rt66.com
> Reply-To: iris-l@rt66.com
> Originator: iris-l@rt66.com
> Sender: iris-l@rt66.com
> Precedence: bulk
> From: LMann76543@aol.com
> To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
> Subject: Southern hemisphere bloom
> X-Listprocessor-Version: 6.0c -- ListProcessor by Anastasios Kotsikonas
> X-Comment: Discussion on garden irises
> X-PMFLAGS: 33554560
> 
> 
> 
> Linda Mann wrote - do you grow irises that were hybridized
> in your own part of the world or mostly US varieties?  Tell us what's in
> bloom now that you really like.
> Grahamstown spring officially begins on September 1 but because of 
the 4 biomes intersecting and having summer rain,  winter rain and 
often no rain at all  plants get pretty confused.  The no name TBs 
have been  flowering since July end of our winter.  I think we are at 
the end of our iris season now and right now VANITY,  BLACK BART,  
LEDA'S LOVER AND LORD BALTIMORE are flowering (and Yes I really like) 
and have a few more bloom stalks.  I can't be sure but I would guess 
that most of the TB's sold in this country come from the US.  I have 
noted only one name of a local hybridizer but on a local garden show 
on TV they actually showed the process - paintbrush thing (very 
interesting to see and not just read and not nearly long enough) so 
there must be more.  What I find really mind boggling are the number 
of hybrids.  I have 3 local catalogues - very few names of which are 
duplicated plus the Schreiners catalog which is like stepping into 
the 4th dimension (I only look at that about 4-5 times a day and more 
on Sundays).   Unless the iris in question has won a medal there 
seems to be no way to ascertain its origin.  South Africans do not 
believe in answering letters.

Sally   where it is wet in South Africa


 > Linda Mann lmann76543@aol.com east TN 
USA > already suffering iris withdrawal and staring at catalog photos
> 
Sally Guye
email zosg@warthog.ru.ac.za





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