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Introducing myself.-Hardiness of species iris.

  • To: IRIS-L@Rt66.com
  • Subject: Introducing myself.-Hardiness of species iris.
  • From: "R. Dennis Hager" <rdhager@dmv.com>
  • Date: Sun, 10 Nov 1996 14:03:11 -0500
  • References: <199611091853.LAA07161@Rt66.com>

Greetings from the Delmarva Penninsula. First of all, I am no relation 
to Ben Hager. I am at the upper end of the Penninsula and according to 
the maps, I should be firmly in Zone 7, but by the weather trends of the 
last two years, I believe I have been transplanted to Zone 6. I recently 
acquired I. japonica and I. douglasiana, both of which I will keep 
inside this winter. Being on the East Coast, I am not overly optimistic 
about growing I. douglasiana, but I've got it. I'll try. Wyman's lists 
hardiness for both species as Zone 8. Is there any evidence that either 
species is more hardy?

I've been growing Japanese, Siberian and Louisiana iris, as well as a 
few TB's and species iris. The Japanese are my definite favorites and I 
have well-suited conditions for them. I am currently growing about 200 
iris selections. In addition, I have sizeable hosta and daylily 
collections. Irises, hostas and daylilies comprise half of my plant list 
which consists of 700 selections.

R. Dennis Hager
e-mail: rdhager@dmv.com





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