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Re: iris garden markers

  • Subject: Re: iris garden markers
  • From: "Robert and Linda Karr" <rlkarr@povn.com>
  • Date: Mon, 20 Oct 2008 08:46:41 -0700

After trying every sort of markers for IDing our iris (all which have been discussed in the past few days plus buried rocks), we took the advice of members of our iris club and ordered See-Fine markers as advertised in the AIS Journal. Turns out that we lived for seven years just 3 blocks north of the woman whose business this is. We currently have about 2600 iris cultivars (species, SDB, MDB, BB, IB, TB, Siberian, Spuria, Louisiana, Japanese, with the large majority tall bearded). About 1500 of those cultivars have See-Fine markers from 7 years ago. As of Fall 2008 all cultivars are so marked. We use the "Painter's Pen" paint pen. Black fine works best for us. The brown fades. I write the information on the front and back of the label. These markers work very well for us as long as one of the kids doesn't rototill too close. These labels can be reused by removing the information from the label. We have yet to find an easy way to do this--some of our club members sand the information off, others spray paint aluminum paint over the information. We have found that the original writing bleeds through the spay paint after a couple of years. A paint remover will work, but is messy. The labels come with a light oil covering which needs to be wiped off--an old T-shirt works best for us. We use the 26 inch markers for TB, Spuria, Siberian, tall species and Louisianas; the 20 inch for IB, BB, and Japanese; the 13 inch for small species, MDB, and SDB.

I have no affliation with See Fine markers' owner other than as a satisfied customer. She is very pleasant to deal with in person and by telephone. Wholesale prices are available. We order for our club members as well as for ourselves and our customers at our small retail garden thereby receiving the wholesale price.Only drawback is that in the winter time when our iris die down to the ground in our cold zone 4 climate, people ask if we have a mouse cemetery :>} Linda

Robert and Linda Karr
Newport Naturals At Spruce Corner
Iris and Alpaca Farm
205 N. Craig Avenue
Newport, WA  99156 (far northeastern part of WA)
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