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Re: Snow Fence

One more thing on snow fences:

So they are slanted (not perpendicular to the ground)?  And slanted
towards whatever they are to protect, or slanted away from prevailing
wind, or slanted towards either or the above?  Are the openings to keep
the wind from blowing the fence down?

If the fences are NOT perpendicular to the ground, it is because they are
cheep, put up by guys who would rather be doing something else with their
lives, andn/or who didn't put enough fence posts to hold the fence up, or
the wind has blown it down.  The openings are to conserve wood, I'm sure,
as well as to allow some wind to blow through so the fence won't completely

The snow fence SHOULD be perpendicular to the ground, don't you think,
experts??  I'm sure this is less an art than a science in the hands of
day workers.

Carolyn Schaffner

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