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Rebloomers, rot, etc


Linda wrote that ENGLISH COTTAGE never rots for her. I have never had it
rot, either, and I, too, have had my share of rot and almost every other
iris disease in the book.  In fact, most of Lloyd's rebloomers that I
grow--IMMORTALITY, BROTHER CARL, HARVEST OF MEMORIES, SPIRIT OF MEMPHIS, I
BLESS, I DO, EARL OF ESSEX, BETHANY CLAIRE (talk about a SUPER
grower!)--have never had any tendancy to rot for me, although other
growers in my area (Virginia) have reported some.

However, I find with rebloomers in general that even if they do rot they
are such fast growers that they usually increase faster than they rot.
The same goes for their resistance to or ability to overcome other
diseases as well.

Other advantages of rebloomers:  Because they are such vigorous growers
they put out a root system faster and are less apt to frost heave during
winter.  (This is important to me because I am usually late getting my
irises planted and don't have time, energy, etc. to mulch my beds and
remove the mulch in the spring.)  And if they do happen to heave, they
are more apt to survive being stuffed back in the mud in early spring.

I don't pamper my iris. So I have discovered over time which are hardy
enough to survive in spite of me.  Almost all my rebloomers are on that
"hardy" list.  (The ones that aren't are dead. :( )

And while I'm on the subject of rebloomers, I have a question.  I grew
LATE RETURNS for 6-7 years and it never bloomed once, either spring or
fall.  It was a very healthy plant and a prolific increaser; I dug it,
divided it, moved it to different locations, but could never get it to
bloom.  So I finally discarded it.  Can anyone explain this?  Is it
possible to start with a rhizome that is simply pre-disposed to never
bloom?

Lois Rose in Central Virginia
25 mi SW of Fredericksburg in southern Spotsylvania County
on a little hill overlooking my murky farm pond in the middle of 50 acres
Zone 7; peak TB bloom May 15 
lros@loc.gov







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