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Re: SPEC: I. tectorum

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: Re: SPEC: I. tectorum
  • From: "R. Dennis Hager" <rdhager@dmv.com>
  • Date: Sun, 5 Oct 1997 06:15:43 -0600 (MDT)

I certainly cannot fault Anner's observations about I. tectorum, but my
experience has been a little different. I think that it stems from the
fact that Anner grows everything well. I just grow everything. 

I grow I. tecorum in a dry garden with poor soil. I do irrigate, but it
competes with the roots of huge sycamore trees. I mulch it lightly (1")
with wood chips and I top dress with 5-10-10 or Hollytone in the fall.
When I am removing leaves and foliage in the fall, I make sure that I
rip out big clumps to make room for more growth. They have been in the
same spot for 8 years and still perform well. I have both a white and a
blue clump--both are over 4' across and were started from 3 single-fan
divisions. In addition, I have given this plant to visitors at all times
of the year and from feedback I have gotten, it grows. I consider
tectorum to be one of the workhorses of the iris world, performing well
in spite of abuse.

BTW, my brother used to grow I. tectorum on his roof. Definite proof
that this plant disease is genetic.

R. Dennis Hager
on Delmarva
Zone 6-7





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