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HIST-Rima's Flavescens, and others


Rima, talking about her country iris that she loves, said:

<< my first iris, I.flavescens, from  an old farmhouse garden that had been
neglected for years.  the rzs were  well above the ground.  I had no tools so
I fearlessly stuck my fingers  under the rz and pulled hard getting up a nice
chunk. ... and it's turned  out to be the very best iris I own. >>

It's a dollbaby among earlier historics. Really beautiful with its little
butter colored standards and pearly white falls with taupe reticulations.
Very special and very fresh looking. Wonderful with violas. I got mine out of
a roadside brush tangle in Albemarle County,Virginia. Mike's got a picture on
the HIPS page at 

http://www.tricities.net/%7Emikelowe/Quick_Fixes/Q_Flavescens.html 

If you get the right combination of the tough little earlier historics they
really bring out the best in each other. The stitching on MME.CHEREAU is a
little bluer, the red of HONORABLE a little clearer, the bright violet of I.
germanica sings, and the iridescence and interesting haft markings and shaggy
little beards of some of them really show up nicely. They also usually have
interesting little felicities of form that are charming and very, well,
flowerlike. 

Anner Whitehead, Richmond, Va
Henry Hall henryanner@aol.com








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