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CULT: herbicides, use of Poast & Princep

  • To: Multiple recipients of list <iris-l@rt66.com>
  • Subject: CULT: herbicides, use of Poast & Princep
  • From: bstassen@comp.uark.edu (Robert E. Stassen)
  • Date: Fri, 31 Oct 1997 07:57:46 -0700 (MST)

Poast was/and still used in large bed of iris in Nebraska, and like
Basagran, has very little soil activity.  Both products were used on
soybeans for post-emergent weed control.

Walter Moores noted that Princep (simazine) would be effective as a residual
product.  I would be very cautious when applying this product, as it was
also used in combination with other "bare-ground" herbicides for industrial
weed control (power substations, railroad ballast).  It is effective because
it does not "leach" easily into the soil, and large seeded crops (sorghum)
can germinate and keep their roots below the herbicide and avoid absorbtion.

Personally, I'd stay away from any herbicide with any soil activity in the
home garden.  Back in the late 70s in Minnesota, Treflan was "the rage" in
iris beds.  Growers were "putting a few drops" in a watering can, and
treating their beds each year.  They had good weed control, but the repeated
use led to a buildup and poor root growth in the plants. 

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