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Re: day lilies


Barbara,

> Is it too late to divide day lilies in the Bay Area? I'd
> like to try mine in a different location.

No, you can divide daylilies almost any time you want wherever the ground
does not freeze more than an inch deep.  My rule is, do it when you have the
time (or when it occurs to you that they need it).  In California, we can
take advantage of a God-given mild climate to chose our own schedule for
many garden chores.  And these days, we often have to fit these in when we
get the chance.

I inherited a large collection of daylilies in one of the gardens I care
for, and for a couple of years I moved them around whenever they came into
bloom because It allowed me to visualize exactly how they would fit into my
color schemes.  By the following year they were well established exactly
where I wanted them and bloomed normally.  For some, it temporarily screwed
up their bloom cycle for the current season, but by the next year the
transplants had had a full year to establish in their new location.  Many of
the repeat-bloomers even flowered in less than a year.

> And if I divide
> them, do I have to dig out the entire plant?

No, you can dig out just a part of the plant and leave the rest to go on
blooming on its regular schedule.


John MacGregor
jonivy@earthlink.net





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