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Re: key limes in CA




K1MIZE@aol.com wrote:

> All:
>
> It is my understanding that Mexican (or "Key") limes are among the most
> frost-sensitive of citrus and need long, hot summers to produce palatable
> fruit.  A much better choice for the California home garden, and one that is
> widely available in local nurseries, is the "Bearss" lime (also known as the
> Tahiti or Persian lime).  It bears fragrant blossoms and shiny fruit all year
> in cool, coastal areas, and is hardier and more attractive than Key lime.
>
> Kurt Mize
> Stockton, California
> USDA Zone 9

May I add my hearty endorsement to Kurt's suggestion to grow "Bearss" limes.  I
inherited a small one in the ground when I bought my house 5 years ago.  For a
long time I thought it was a lemon because the fruits turn slightly yellow as
they ripen.  So I used them as lemons when cooking, making "lemonade".  After
the tree was corectly identified for me, I still use them as lemons. They are
juicy and delicious!

The tree is beautiful, much softer and rounder in shape than a lemon, the leaves
shiney, the thorns less, so easier to prune.  I don't live in a "cool coastal
climate", but the tree does bear almost all year round. And I don't have to
climb up to harvest; just give a low branch a good shaking and the ripe ones
fall to the ground!

I also inherited a thin skinned orange, better for juicing than eating. Any
ideas what it could be?    And a pummelo which produces fruit that seems to need
to stay a very long time on the tree before getting sweet. Can anyone give me
some guidance as to harvesting and how to use this abundant fruit?

Jan Smithen
Upland,   Inland Southern California
Sunset zone 19





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